form20-f.htm


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

 
FORM 20-F
 
(Mark One)
 
o            REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
x           ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007
 
OR
 
o            TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
          For the transition period from                          to                
       
OR
 
o           SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
               Date of event requiring this shell company report:
 
Commission file number: 1-33373         

CAPITAL PRODUCT PARTNERS L.P.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 
Republic of The Marshall Islands
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 
3 Iassonos Street, Piraeus, 18537 Greece
+30 210 458 4950
(Address and telephone number of principal executive offices)
 

 
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common units representing limited partnership interests
Nasdaq Global Market
 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None
Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.
 
13,512,500 Common Units
8,805,522 Subordinated Units
455,470 General Partner Units
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
YES o              NO x
If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
YES o              NO x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
YES x              NO o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definitions of “accelerated filer” and “large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):
 
 
  Large accelerated filer o  
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer x 
 
Indicate by check mark which financial statements item the registrant has elected to follow.
ITEM 17 o               ITEM 18 x
If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
YES o              NO x
 



 
 
 
CAPITAL PRODUCT PARTNERS L.P.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 

   
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This annual report on Form 20-F (the “Annual Report”) should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements and accompanying notes included herein.
 
Statements included in this Annual Report which are not historical facts (including statements concerning plans and objectives of management for future operations or economic performance, or assumptions related thereto) are forward-looking statements. In addition, we and our representatives may from time to time make other oral or written statements which are also forward-looking statements. Such statements include, in particular, statements about our plans, strategies, business prospects, changes and trends in our business, financial condition and the markets in which we operate, and involve risks and uncertainties. In some cases, you can identify the forward-looking statements by the use of words such as “may,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “forecast,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “propose,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Forward-looking statements appear in a number of places and include statements with respect to, among other things:
 
 
anticipated future acquisition of vessels from Capital Maritime, and in particular the expected acquisition of the M/T Aristofanis in the second quarter of 2008;
 
 
our anticipated growth strategies;
 
 
future charter hire rates and vessel values;
 
 
our ability to make cash distributions on the units;
 
 
our future financial condition or results of operations and our future revenues and expenses, including revenues from profit sharing arrangements;
 
 
the repayment of debt and settling of interest rate swaps;
 
 
our ability to access debt and equity markets;
 
 
future refined product and crude oil prices and production;
 
 
planned capital expenditures and availability of capital resources to fund capital expenditures;
 
 
future supply of, and demand for, refined products and crude oil;
 
 
increases in domestic oil consumption;
 
 
changes in interest rates;
 
 
our ability to maintain long-term relationships with major refined product importers and exporters, major crude oil companies, and major commodity traders;
 
 
our ability to leverage to our advantage Capital Maritime & Trading Corp.’s (“Capital Maritime”) relationships and reputation in the shipping industry;
 
 
our continued ability to enter into long-term, fixed-rate time charters with our tanker charterers;
 
 
obtaining tanker projects that we or Capital Maritime bid on;
 
 
our ability to maximize the use of our vessels, including the re-deployment or disposition of vessels no longer under long-term time charter;
 
 
timely purchases and deliveries of newbuilding vessels;
 
 
our ability to compete successfully for future chartering and newbuilding opportunities;
 
 
the expected cost of, and our ability to comply with, governmental regulations and maritime self-regulatory organization standards, as well as standard regulations imposed by our charterers applicable to our business;
 
 
our anticipated general and administrative expenses and our expenses under the management agreement and the administrative services agreement with Capital Ship Management Corp., a subsidiary of Capital Maritime (“Capital Ship Management”), and for reimbursement for fees and costs of our general partner;
 
 
the expected impact of heightened environmental and quality concerns of insurance underwriters, regulators and charterers;
 
 
the anticipated taxation of our partnership and distributions to our unitholders;
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
estimated future maintenance and replacement capital expenditures;
 
 
expected demand in the refined product shipping sector in general and the demand for our medium range vessels in particular;
 
 
our ability to retain key employees;
 
 
customers’ increasing emphasis on environmental and safety concerns;
 
 
future sales of our common units in the public market; and
 
 
our business strategy and other plans and objectives for future operations.
 
These and other forward-looking statements are made based upon management’s current plans, expectations, estimates, assumptions and beliefs concerning future events impacting us and therefore involve a number of risks and uncertainties, including those risks discussed in “Risk Factors.” The risks, uncertainties and assumptions involve known and unknown risks and are inherently subject to significant uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. We caution that forward-looking statements are not guarantees and that actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements.
 
We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement or statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of these factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to be materially different from those contained in any forward- looking statement. You should carefully review and consider the various disclosures included in this Annual Report and in our other filings made with the SEC that attempt to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect our business, prospects and results of operations.
 
 

 
 
PART I
 
Item 1.    Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisors.
 
Not Applicable.
 
Item 2.   Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable.
 
Not Applicable.
 
Item 3.   Key Information.

Selected Financial Data

We have derived the following selected historical financial and other data for the three years ending December 31, 2007 from our audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006, 2005 respectively, appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report.  The historical financial and other data presented for the period from August 27, 2003 (inception) to December 31, 2004 have been derived from audited financial statements not required to be included in this Annual Report and are provided for comparison purposes. August 27, 2003 refers to the incorporation date of the vessel-owning subsidiary of the M/T Aktoras and is the earliest incorporation date of any of our vessel-owning subsidiaries.
 
Consolidated Financial Statements. Financial statements presented reflecting our balance sheet as of December 31, 2007 and results of operations and cash flows from April 4, 2007 (completion of our initial public offering) to December 31, 2007 are referred to herein as our “consolidated financial statements” and include operations of the five vessels which had been delivered as of December 31, 2006 and the M/T Attikos and operations of the remaining seven vessels in our fleet which were delivered between January and September 2007 as of their respective delivery dates.
 
Predecessor Combined Financial Statements. Financial statements presented reflecting the historical carrying costs of certain vessel-owning companies under the common control of Capital Maritime which were contributed to us by Capital Maritime at the time of our initial public offering or which were purchased by us from Capital Maritime are collectively referred to herein as our “predecessor combined financial statements”. These include the balance sheet as of December 31, 2006 and the results of operations and cash flows of the eight vessels that comprised our fleet at the time of our initial public offering (the “initial vessels”) from their respective delivery dates in 2006 to April 3, 2007, the date they were transferred to us, and of the M/T Attikos from January 20, 2005, the date it was delivered to Capital Maritime, to September 23, 2007, the date it was acquired by us. Construction costs incurred by Capital Maritime in connection with the M/T Attikos during the period from August 27, 2003 (inception) to December 31, 2004 are included in the historical financial data for the period presented below.
 
Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future. Specifically, our audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements are not comparable, as our initial public offering and certain other transactions that occurred during 2007, including the delivery of four newbuildings, the acquisition of the M/T Attikos, the agreement we entered into with Capital Ship Management for the provision of management and administrative services to our fleet for a fixed fee and the new financing arrangements we entered into, have affected our results of operations. Furthermore, for the year ended December 31, 2006, only six of the vessels in our current fleet had been delivered to Capital Maritime. Five of these vessels were delivered between April and November 2006 and were in operation for only a portion of the year. The M/T Attikos was delivered on January 20, 2005 and is the only vessel in our fleet which had been delivered to Capital Maritime during the year ended December 31, 2005. Consequently, the following table should be read together with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, the historical audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements and the accompanying notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The table should also be read together with “Item 5: —Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”.
 
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. All numbers are in thousands of U.S. Dollars, except numbers of units and earnings per unit.
 
 

 

   
Period from
Aug. 27, 2003 (inception) to
Dec. 31, 2004*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2005*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2006*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2007
 
Income Statement Data:
                       
Revenues
  $
-
    $
4,377
    $ 19,913     $ 72,543  
Expenses:
                               
Voyage expenses(1)
   
-
     
520
      373       770  
Vessel operating expenses—related party
   
-
     
216
      890       12,283  
Vessel operating expenses(2)
   
40
     
1,932
      4,043       3,196  
General and administrative expenses
   
-
     
-
      -       1,477  
Depreciation and amortization
   
-
     
360
      3,370       13,109  
 
                               
Total operating expenses
   
40
     
3,028
      8,676       30,835  
                                 
Operating income (expense)
   
(40
)
   
1,349
      11,237       41,708  
Interest expense and finance costs
   
-
     
(389
)
    (4,584
)
    (10,809
)
Loss on interest rate swap agreement
   
-
      -       -       (3,763
)
Interest income
   
-
      1       13       710  
Foreign currency gain/(loss), net
   
-
      9       (56
)
    (19
)
 
                               
Net income (loss)
    (40
)
  $ 970     $ 6,610     $ 27,827  
                                 
Less:
                               
Net income attributable to predecessor operations:
                               
Initial vessels’ net income from January 1, 2007 to April 3, 2007
    -       -       -     $ (5,328
)
Attikos’ net income  from January 1, 2007 to September 23, 2007
    -       -       -       (928
)
 
                               
Partnership’s net income for the period from April 4 to December 31, 2007
    -       -       -       21,571  
General partner’s interest in our  net income
    -       -       -       431  
Limited partners’ interest in our net income
    -       -       -       21,140  
Net income per limited partner unit, basic and diluted:
                             
Common units
    -       -       -       1.11  
   Subordinated units
    -       -       -       0.70  
   Total units
    -       -        -       0.95  
Weighted-average units outstanding (basic and diluted):
                             
Common units
    -       -       -       13,512,500  
   Subordinated units
    -       -       -       8,805,522  
   Total units
    -       -       -       22,318,022  
 
                               
Balance Sheet Data (at end of period):
 
                             
Vessels, net and under construction
 
$
25,152     $ 49,351     $ 208,028     $ 429,171  
Total assets
   
25,165
      50,553       216,124       454,914  
Total partners’/stockholders’ equity
    19,658       24,840       49,397       161,939  
Number of shares/units
    3,700       3,700       3,700       22,773,492  
Common units
    -       -       -       13,512,500  
    Subordinated units
    -       -       -       8,805,522  
General Partner units
    -       -       -       455,470  
Dividends declared per unit
    -       -       -     $ 0.75  
 
 
 

   
Period from
Aug. 27, 2003 (inception) to
Dec. 31, 2004*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2005*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2006*
   
Year Ended
Dec. 31, 2007
 
                                 
Cash Flow Data:
                               
Net cash provided by operating activities
    29       1,468       9,497       50,582  
Net cash used in investing activities
    (25,152
)
    (24,559
)
   
(162,047
)
    (246,938
)
Net cash provided by financing activities
    25,134       23,087       153,782       215,034  
___________
 
(1)
Vessel voyage expenses primarily consist of commissions, port expenses, canal dues and bunkers. Since April 4, 2007 our only voyage expenses have been commissions.
(2)
Since April 4, 2007 our vessel operating expenses have consisted primarily of management fees payable to our manager, who provides commercial and technical services such as crewing, repairs and maintenance, insurance, stores, spares and lubricants, as well as administrative services pursuant to management and administrative services agreements. Vessel operating expenses presented in the predecessor combined financial statements consist of all expenses relating to the operation of the vessels including crewing, repairs and maintenance, insurances, stores and lubricants, management fees and miscellaneous expenses.
*
The amount of historical earnings per unit for the period from August 27, 2003 (inception) to December 31, 2004, for the years ended December 31, 2005 and 2006 and for the period from January 1, 2007 to April 3, 2007, giving retroactive impact to the number of common and subordinated units (and the 2% general partner interest) that were issued upon the completion of our initial public offering on April 3, 2007 is not presented in our selected historical financial data. We do not believe that a presentation of earnings per unit for these periods would not be meaningful to our investors as the vessels comprising our initial fleet and the M/T Attikos were under construction during the period from August 27, 2003 (inception) to December 31, 2004 and during the year ended December 31, 2005 the vessel-owning subsidiaries included herein, with the exception of the one which owns the M/T Attikos which was delivered in January 2005 to Capital Maritime, were in the start-up phase. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2006 only six of the 13 vessels we owned as of December 31, 2007 had been delivered to us and only the M/T Attikos was in operation for the full year ended December 31, 2006, while the other five vessels were in operation for only part of the period (the vessels were delivered in April, May, July, August and November 2006, respectively) and a portion of the revenues generated during 2006 was derived from charters with different terms and conditions from those in the charters in place during 2007. Earnings per unit for these periods are not reflective of our anticipated earnings and operations going forward.
 
Please note that our audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2007, 2006 and 2005 and for the period from August 27, 2003 (inception) to December 31, 2004 have been retroactively adjusted to reflect the results of operations and initial construction costs of the M/T Attikos, which was delivered in January 2005 to an entity under common control and acquired by us in September 2007.
 
Risk Factors
 
Some of the following risks relate principally to the countries and the industry in which we operate and the nature of our business in general. Although many of our business risks are comparable to those of a corporation engaged in a similar business would face, limited partner interests are inherently different from the capital stock of a corporation. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations. In particular, if any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or operating results could be materially adversely affected. In that case, we might not be able to pay distributions on our common units, the trading price of our common units could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment.
 
Risks Inherent in Our Business
 
We may not have sufficient cash from operations to enable us to pay the quarterly distribution on our common units following the establishment of cash reserves and payment of fees and expenses.
 
We may not have sufficient cash available each quarter to pay the declared quarterly distribution per common unit following establishment of cash reserves and payment of fees and expenses. The amount of cash we can distribute on our common units principally depends upon the amount of cash we generate from our operations, which may fluctuate based on numerous factors generally described under this “Risk Factors” heading, including, among other things:
 
 
the rates we obtain from our charters;
 
 
the level of additional revenues we generate from our profit-sharing arrangements, if any;
 
 
 
 
 
the level of our operating costs, such as the cost of crews and insurance, following the expiration of our management agreement pursuant to which we pay a fixed daily fee for an initial term of approximately five years from the time we take delivery of each vessel, which includes the expenses for its next scheduled special or intermediate survey, as applicable, and related drydocking;
 
 
the number of unscheduled off-hire days for our fleet and the timing of, and number of days required for, scheduled drydocking of our vessels;
 
 
delays in the delivery of newbuildings and the beginning of payments under charters relating to those vessels;
 
 
demand for seaborne transportation of refined oil products and crude oil;
 
 
supply of product and crude oil tankers and specifically the number of newbuildings entering the world tanker fleet each year;
 
 
prevailing global and regional economic and political conditions; and
 
 
the effect of governmental regulations and maritime self-regulatory organization standards on the conduct of our business.
 
The actual amount of cash we will have available for distribution also will depend on other factors, some of which are beyond our control, such as:
 
 
the level of capital expenditures we make, including for maintaining vessels, building new vessels, acquiring existing vessels and complying with regulations;
 
 
our debt service requirements and restrictions on distributions contained in our debt instruments;
 
 
interest rate fluctuations;
 
 
the cost of acquisitions, if any;
 
 
fluctuations in our working capital needs;
 
 
our ability to make working capital borrowings, including to pay distributions to unitholders; and
 
 
the amount of any cash reserves, including reserves for future maintenance and replacement capital expenditures, working capital and other matters, established by our board of directors in its discretion.
 
The amount of cash we generate from our operations may differ materially from our profit or loss for the period, which will be affected by non-cash items. As a result of this and the other factors mentioned above, we may make cash distributions during periods when we record losses and may not make cash distributions during periods when we record net income.
 
The shipping industry is cyclical, which may lead to lower charter hire rates and lower vessel values, resulting in decreased distributions to our common unitholders.
 
The shipping industry is cyclical, which may result in volatility in charter hire rates and vessel values. We may not be able to successfully charter our vessels in the future or renew existing charters at the same or similar rates. If we are required to enter into a charter when charter hire rates are low, our results of operations and our ability to make cash distributions to our common unitholders could be adversely affected.
 
In addition, the market value and charter hire rates of product and crude oil tankers can fluctuate substantially over time due to a number of different factors, including:
 
 
prevailing economic conditions in the market in which the vessel trades;
 
 
regulatory change;
 
 
lower levels of demand for the seaborne transportation of refined products and crude oil;
 
 
increases in the supply of vessel capacity; and
 
 
the cost of retrofitting or modifying existing ships, as a result of technological advances in vessel design or equipment, changes in applicable environmental or other regulations or standards, or otherwise.
 
We have entered into an agreement with Capital Maritime to purchase, among others, its interests in the subsidiaries that own two newbuildings, expected to be delivered during 2008, at pre-determined purchase prices. We will purchase from Capital Maritime its interests in each subsidiary that owns the newbuildings upon delivery of the vessel to the applicable subsidiary. Even if the market value of similar vessels declines between the time we entered into the agreement and the time the newbuildings are actually delivered, we will still be required to purchase the interests in those subsidiaries at the prices specified in the agreement with Capital Maritime. As a result, we may pay substantially more for those vessels than we would pay if we were to purchase those vessels from unaffiliated third parties. For more information on our agreement to purchase the two newbuildings from Capital Maritime, please read “Item 4: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Purchase of Vessels Following the Offering” and “Item 7B: Related Party Transactions—Share Purchase Agreement.”
 
 
 
 
If we sell a vessel at a time when the market value of our vessels has fallen, the sale may be at less than the vessel’s carrying amount, resulting in a loss. A decline in the market value of our vessels could also lead to a default under any prospective credit facility to which we become a party, affect our ability to refinance our existing credit facilities and/or limit our ability to obtain additional financing.
 
We have a limited operating history, which makes it more difficult to accurately forecast our future results and may make it difficult for investors to evaluate our business and our future prospects, both of which will increase the risk of your investment.
 
We were formed as an independent limited partnership on January 16, 2007. Only five of the vessels in our current fleet had been delivered to the relevant vessel-owning subsidiaries as of December 31, 2006 and were in operation during a portion of the period then ended. Moreover, as these vessels were operated as part of Capital Maritime’s fleet during the reporting period, the vessels were operated in a different manner than they are currently operated, and thus their historical results may not be indicative of their future results. Because of our limited operating history, we lack extended historical financial and operational data, making it more difficult for an investor to evaluate our business, forecast our future revenues and other operating results, and assess the merits and risks of an investment in our common units. This lack of information will increase the risk of your investment. Moreover, you should consider and evaluate our prospects in light of the risks and uncertainties frequently encountered by companies with a limited operating history. These risks and difficulties include challenges in accurate financial planning as a result of limited historical data and the uncertainties resulting from having had a relatively limited time period in which to implement and evaluate our business strategies as compared to older companies with longer operating histories. Our failure to address these risks and difficulties successfully could materially harm our business and operating results.
 
We must make substantial capital expenditures to maintain the operating capacity of our fleet, which will reduce our cash available for distribution. In addition, each quarter our board of directors is required to deduct estimated maintenance and replacement capital expenditures from operating surplus, which may result in less cash available to unitholders than if actual maintenance and replacement capital expenditures were deducted.
 
We must make substantial capital expenditures to maintain, over the long-term, the operating capacity of our fleet. These maintenance and replacement capital expenditures include capital expenditures associated with drydocking a vessel, modifying an existing vessel or acquiring a new vessel to the extent these expenditures are incurred to maintain the operating capacity of our fleet. These expenditures could increase as a result of changes in:
 
 
the cost of our labor and materials;
 
 
the cost and replacement life of suitable replacement vessels;
 
 
customer/market requirements;
 
 
increases in the size of our fleet;
 
 
the age of the vessels in our fleet;
 
 
charter rates in the market; and
 
 
governmental regulations, industry and maritime self-regulatory organization standards relating to safety, security or the environment.
 
Our significant maintenance and replacement capital expenditures will reduce the amount of cash we have available for distribution to our unitholders. Any costs associated with scheduled drydocking are included in a fixed daily fee of $5,500 per time chartered vessel ($8,500 for the M/T Amore Mio II), that we pay Capital Ship Management under a management agreement, for an initial term of approximately five years from the time we take delivery of each vessel, which includes the expenses for its next scheduled special or intermediate survey, as applicable, and related drydocking. In the event our management agreement is not renewed, we will separately deduct estimated capital expenditures associated with drydocking from our operating surplus in addition to estimated replacement capital expenditures.
 
Our partnership agreement requires our board of directors to deduct estimated, rather than actual, maintenance and replacement capital expenditures from operating surplus each quarter in an effort to reduce fluctuations in operating surplus. The amount of estimated capital expenditures deducted from operating surplus is subject to review and change by the conflicts committee at least once a year. In years when estimated capital expenditures are higher than actual capital expenditures, the amount of cash available for distribution to unitholders will be lower than if actual capital expenditures were deducted from operating surplus. If our board of directors underestimates the appropriate level of estimated maintenance and replacement capital expenditures, we may have less cash available for distribution in future periods when actual capital expenditures exceed our previous estimates.
 
 
 
 
If Capital Maritime or any third party seller we may contract with in the future for the purchase of newbuildings fails to make construction payments for such vessels, the shipyard may rescind the purchase contract and we may lose access to such vessels or need to finance such vessels before they begin operating, which could harm our business and our ability to make cash distributions.
 
To date, all the newbuildings we have acquired and agreed to acquire have been contracted directly by Capital Maritime and all costs for the construction and delivery of such vessels have been, or are being, incurred by Capital Maritime. Since our initial public offering in April 2007 we have taken delivery of five newbuildings from Capital Maritime, with an additional two expected for delivery in 2008. In the future, we may enter into similar arrangements with Capital Maritime or other third parties for the acquisition of newbuildings. If Capital Maritime or any third party sellers we contract with in the future fail to make construction payments for the newbuildings after receiving notice by the shipbuilder following nonpayment on any installment due date, the shipbuilder could rescind the newbuilding purchase contract. As a result of such default, Capital Maritime or the third party seller could lose all or part of the installment payments made prior to such default, and we could either lose access to the remaining newbuildings or any future vessels we contract to acquire or may need to finance such vessels before they begin operating and generating voyage revenues, which could harm our business and reduce our ability to make cash distributions.
 
If we finance the purchase of any additional vessels we acquire in the future or the purchase of the contracted  newbuildings to be delivered in 2008 through cash from operations or by issuing debt or equity securities, our ability to make cash distributions may be diminished, our financial leverage could increase or our unitholders could be diluted. In addition, if we expand the size of our fleet by directly contracting newbuildings in the future, we generally will be required to make significant installment payments for such acquisitions prior to their delivery and generation of revenue.
 
The actual cost of a new product or crude oil tanker varies significantly depending on the market price charged by shipyards, the size and specifications of the vessel, governmental regulations and maritime self-regulatory organization standards. The total delivered cost of a vessel will be higher and include financing, construction supervision, vessel start-up and other costs.
 
To date, all the newbuildings we have acquired and agreed to acquire were contracted directly by Capital Maritime and all costs for the construction and delivery of these vessels have been, or are being, incurred by Capital Maritime. As of March 31, 2008, we had taken delivery of five newbuildings and purchased two additional vessels from Capital Maritime. We have financed the purchase of these vessels, and intend to finance the purchase of the remaining newbuildings to be delivered in 2008 and any other vessel we contract to acquire from Capital Maritime, either with debt, or partly with debt and partly by issuing additional equity securities. If we issue additional common units or other equity securities your ownership interest in us will be diluted. Please read “—We may issue additional equity securities without your approval, which would dilute your ownership interest” below.
 
If we elect to expand our fleet in the future by entering into contracts for newbuildings directly with shipyards, we generally will be required to make installment payments prior to their delivery. We typically must pay 5-25% of the purchase price of a vessel upon signing the purchase contract, even though delivery of the completed vessel will not occur until much later (approximately 18-36 months later for current orders), which could reduce cash available for distributions to unitholders. If we finance these acquisition costs by issuing debt or equity securities, we will increase the aggregate amount of interest payments or quarterly distributions we must make prior to generating cash from the operation of the newbuilding.
 
To fund the remaining portion of the acquisition price of the two newbuildings expected to be delivered in 2008 or the acquisition price of any additional vessels we may contract to purchase from Capital Maritime or other third parties and other related capital expenditures, we will be required to use cash from operations or incur borrowings or raise capital through the sale of debt or additional equity securities. Use of cash from operations will reduce cash available for distributions to unitholders. Even if we are successful in obtaining necessary funds, the terms of such financings could limit our ability to pay cash distributions to unitholders. Incurring additional debt may significantly increase our interest expense and financial leverage, and issuing additional equity securities may result in significant unitholder dilution and would increase the aggregate amount of cash required to meet our quarterly distributions to unitholders, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to make cash distributions.
 
 
 
 
Our ability to obtain bank financing and/or to access the capital markets for future equity offerings may be limited by prevailing economic conditions. If we are unable to obtain funding or access the capital markets, we may be unable to complete any future purchases of vessels from Capital Maritime or from third parties.
 
Our ability to obtain bank financing or to access the capital markets for future offerings may be limited by our financial condition at the time of any such financing or offering, as well as by adverse market conditions resulting from, among other things, general economic conditions, weakness in the financial markets and contingencies and uncertainties that are beyond our control. Our failure to obtain the funds for necessary future capital expenditures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and on our ability to make cash distributions. We expect to fund part of the purchase price of the vessels to be delivered in 2008 through drawdowns on our existing credit facility and the remainder through issuances of equity. If the prevailing equity market conditions at the time of delivery of the vessels are not favorable, we may be unable to complete the purchases, or we may have to complete them at terms not favorable to us or to our unitholders.
 
Our debt levels may limit our flexibility in obtaining additional financing and in pursuing other business opportunities.
 
As of March 31, 2008, we had drawn down $322.5 million under our existing credit facility and had $47.5 million available. In addition, we entered into a new $350.0 million credit facility on March 19, 2008 and, following the acquisition of the M/T Amore Mio II on March 27, 2008, had $304.0 million available. For more information regarding the terms of our existing revolving credit facilities, please read “Item 5:—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Revolving Credit Facilities.” Our level of debt could have important consequences to us, including the following:
 
 
our ability to obtain additional financing, if necessary, for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other purposes may be impaired, or such financing may not be available on favorable terms;
 
 
we will need a substantial portion of our cash flow to make interest payments and, following the end of the relevant non-amortizing periods, principal payments on our debt, reducing the funds that would otherwise be available for operations, future business opportunities and distributions to unitholders;
 
 
our debt level will make us more vulnerable to competitive pressures, or to a downturn in our business or in the economy in general, than our competitors with less debt; and
 
 
our debt level may limit our flexibility in responding to changing business and economic conditions.
 
Our ability to service our debt will depend upon, among other things, our future financial and operating performance, which will be affected by prevailing economic conditions and financial, business, regulatory and other factors, some of which are beyond our control. If our operating results are not sufficient to service our current or future indebtedness, we will be forced to take actions such as reducing distributions, reducing or delaying our business activities, acquisitions, investments or capital expenditures, selling assets, restructuring or refinancing our debt, or seeking additional equity capital or bankruptcy protection. We may not be able to effect any of these remedies on satisfactory terms, or at all.
 
 Our existing credit facilities contain, and we expect that any future credit facilities we may enter into will contain, restrictive covenants, which may limit our business and financing activities.
 
The operating and financial restrictions and covenants in our existing revolving credit facilities and in any future credit facility we enter into could adversely affect our ability to finance future operations or capital needs or to engage, expand or pursue our business activities. For example, our existing revolving credit facilities require the consent of our lenders to, or limit our ability to, among other items:
 
 
incur or guarantee indebtedness;
 
 
charge, pledge or encumber the vessels;
 
 
change the flag, class, management or ownership of our vessels;
 
 
change the commercial and technical management of our vessels;
 
 
sell or change the beneficial ownership or control of our vessels; and
 
 
subordinate our obligations thereunder to any general and administrative costs relating to the vessels, including the fixed daily fee payable under the management agreement.
 
Our credit facilities also require us to comply with the ISM Code and to maintain valid safety management certificates and documents of compliance at all times.
 
In addition, our existing credit facilities require us to:
 
 
 
 
 
maintain minimum free consolidated liquidity (50% of which may be in the form of undrawn commitments under the relevant credit facility) of at least $500,000 per financed vessel;
 
 
maintain a ratio of EBITDA (as defined in each credit facility) to interest expense of at least 2.00 to 1.00 on a trailing four-quarter basis; and
 
 
maintain a ratio of  net Total Indebtedness to the aggregate Fair Market Value (as defined in each credit facility) of our total fleet, current or future, of no more than 0.725 to 1.00.
 
We will also be required to maintain an aggregate fair market value of our financed vessels equal to 125% of the aggregate amount outstanding under each credit facility.
 
Our ability to comply with the covenants and restrictions contained in our existing revolving credit facilities and any other debt instruments we may enter into in the future may be affected by events beyond our control, including prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. If market or other economic conditions deteriorate, our ability to comply with these covenants may be impaired. If we are in breach of any of the restrictions, covenants, ratios or tests in our existing credit facility, especially if we trigger a cross-default currently contained in certain of our loan agreements, a significant portion of our obligations may become immediately due and payable, and our lenders’ commitment to make further loans to us may terminate. We may not have, or be able to obtain, sufficient funds to make these accelerated payments. In addition, obligations under our credit facilities are secured by our vessels, and if we are unable to repay debt under the credit facilities, the lenders could seek to foreclose on those assets.
 
Restrictions in our debt agreements may prevent us from paying distributions.
 
Our payment of interest and, following the end of the relevant non-amortizing periods, principal on the debt will reduce cash available for distribution on our units. In addition, our existing credit facilities prohibit the payment of distributions if we are not in compliance with certain financial covenants or  upon the occurrence of an event of default or if the fair market value of our financed vessels is less than 125% of the aggregate amount outstanding under each of our credit facilities.
 
Events of default under our credit facilities include:
 
 
failure to pay principal or interest when due;
 
 
breach of certain undertakings, negative covenants and financial covenants contained in the credit facility, any related security document or guarantee or the interest rate swap agreements, including failure to maintain unencumbered title to any of the vessel-owning subsidiaries or any of the assets of the vessel-owning subsidiaries and failure to maintain proper insurance;
 
 
any breach of the credit facility, any related security document or guarantee or the interest rate swap agreements (other than breaches described in the preceding two bullet points) if, in the opinion of the lenders, such default is capable of remedy and continues unremedied for 20 days after written notice of the lenders;
 
 
any representation, warranty or statement made by us in the credit facility or any drawdown notice thereunder or related security document or guarantee or the interest rate swap agreements is untrue or misleading when made;
 
 
a cross-default of our other indebtedness of $5.0 million or greater or of the indebtedness of our subsidiaries of $750,000 or greater;
 
 
we become, in the reasonable opinion of the lenders, unable to pay our debts when due;
 
 
any of our or our subsidiaries’ assets are subject to any form of execution, attachment, arrest, sequestration or distress in respect of a sum of $1.0 million or more that is not discharged within 10 business days;
 
 
an event of insolvency or bankruptcy;
 
 
cessation or suspension of our business or of a material part thereof;
 
 
unlawfulness, non-effectiveness or repudiation of any material provision of our credit facility, of any of the related finance and guarantee documents or of our interest rate swap agreements;
 
 
failure of effectiveness of security documents or guarantee;
 
 
the common units cease to be listed on the Nasdaq Global Market or on any other recognized securities exchange;
 
 
any breach under any provisions contained in our interest rate swap agreements;
 
 
termination of our interest rate swap agreements or an event of default thereunder that is not remedied within five business days;
 
 
 
 
 
invalidity of a security document in any material respect or if any security document ceases to provide a perfected first priority security interest; or
 
 
any other event that occurs or circumstance that arises in light of which the lenders reasonably consider that there is a significant risk that we will be unable to discharge our liabilities under the credit facility, related security and guarantee documents or interest rate swap agreements.
 
We anticipate that any subsequent refinancing of our current debt or any new debt will have similar restrictions. For more information regarding our financing arrangements, please read “Item 5: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources.”
 
We currently derive all of our revenues from a limited number of customers, and the loss of any customer or charter or vessel could result in a significant loss of revenues and cash flow.
 
We have derived, and believe that we will continue to derive, all of our revenues and cash flow from a limited number of customers. BP Shipping Limited, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. and Trafigura Beheer B.V. accounted for all of our revenues for the year ending December 31, 2007, with BP and Morgan Stanley representing 64% and 28% of our revenues, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2006, BP and Morgan Stanley represented 53% and 23% of the revenues of our predecessor, respectively. In January 2008 we took delivery of the first of the three newbuildings chartered to subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., increasing the number of our customers for 2008 to four. We could lose a customer or the benefits of a charter if:
 
 
the customer fails to make charter payments because of its financial inability, disagreements with us or otherwise;
 
 
the customer exercises certain rights to terminate the charter or purchase the vessel;
 
 
the customer terminates the charter because we fail to deliver the vessel within a fixed period of time, the vessel is lost or damaged beyond repair, there are serious deficiencies in the vessel or prolonged periods of off-hire, or we default under the charter; or
 
 
a prolonged force majeure event affecting the customer, including damage to or destruction of relevant production facilities, war or political unrest prevents us from performing services for that customer.
 
Please read “Item 4: Business Overview—Our Charters”.
 
If we lose a key charter, we may be unable to re-deploy the related vessel on terms as favorable to us due to the long-term nature of most charters. If we are unable to re-deploy a vessel for which the charter has been terminated, we will not receive any revenues from that vessel, but we may be required to pay expenses necessary to maintain the vessel in proper operating condition. Until such time as the vessel is re-chartered, we may have to operate it in the spot market at charter rates which may not be as favorable to us as our current charter rates. In addition, if a customer exercises its right to purchase a vessel, we would not receive any further revenue from the vessel and may be unable to obtain a substitute vessel and charter. This may cause us to receive decreased revenue and cash flows from having fewer vessels operating in our fleet. Any replacement newbuilding would not generate revenues during its construction, and we may be unable to charter any replacement vessel on terms as favorable to us as those of the terminated charter. Any compensation under our charters for a purchase of the vessels may not adequately compensate us for the loss of the vessel and related time charter.
 
The loss of any of our customers, time or bareboat charters or vessels, or a decline in payments under our charters, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and our ability to make cash distributions.
 
Delays in deliveries of newbuildings, our decision to cancel or our inability to otherwise complete the acquisitions of our newbuildings, could harm our operating results and lead to the termination of the related charters.
 
We are scheduled to take delivery of certain contracted newbuildings during the remainder of 2008, which are being built at STX Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. shipyard in South Korea. The delivery of these vessels, or any other newbuildings we may contract to acquire or order in the future, could be delayed, not completed or canceled, which would delay or eliminate our expected receipt of revenues under the charters for the vessels. The shipbuilder could fail to deliver the newbuilding vessels as agreed, or Capital Maritime could cancel a purchase or a newbuilding contract because the shipbuilder has not met its obligations, including its obligation to maintain agreed refund guarantees in place for our benefit. For prolonged delays, the customer may terminate the time charter.
 
Our receipt of newbuildings could be delayed, canceled, or otherwise not completed because of:
 
 
quality or engineering problems;
 
 
changes in governmental regulations or maritime self-regulatory organization standards;
 
 
 
 
 
work stoppages or other labor disturbances at the shipyard;
 
 
bankruptcy or other financial crisis of the shipbuilder;
 
 
a backlog of orders at the shipyard;
 
 
political or economic disturbances in South Korea, where the vessels are being built;
 
 
weather interference or catastrophic event, such as a major earthquake or fire;
 
 
the shipbuilder failing to deliver the vessels in accordance with our vessel specifications;
 
 
our requests for changes to the original vessel specifications;
 
 
shortages of or delays in the receipt of necessary construction materials, such as steel;
 
 
our inability to finance the purchase of the vessels;
 
 
a deterioration in Capital Maritime’s relations with STX; or
 
 
our inability to obtain requisite permits or approvals.
 
If delivery of a vessel is materially delayed, it could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition and our ability to make cash distributions.
 
We depend on Capital Maritime and its affiliates to assist us in operating and expanding our business.
 
Pursuant to a management agreement and an administrative services agreement between us and Capital Ship Management, Capital Ship Management provides significant commercial and technical management services (including the commercial and technical management of our vessels, class certifications, vessel maintenance and crewing, purchasing and insurance and shipyard supervision) as well as administrative, financial and other support services to us. Please read “Item 7B: Related Party Transactions—Management Agreement” and “—Administrative Services Agreement”. Our operational success and ability to execute our growth strategy will depend significantly upon Capital Ship Management’s satisfactory performance of these services. Our business will be harmed if Capital Ship Management fails to perform these services satisfactorily, if Capital Ship Management cancels either of these agreements, or if Capital Ship Management stops providing these services to us. We may also in the future contract with Capital Maritime for it to have newbuildings constructed on our behalf and to incur the construction-related financing. We would purchase the vessels on or after delivery based on an agreed-upon price.
 
Our ability to enter into new charters and expand our customer relationships will depend largely on our ability to leverage our relationship with Capital Maritime and its reputation and relationships in the shipping industry. If Capital Maritime suffers material damage to its reputation or relationships, it may harm our ability to:
 
 
renew existing charters upon their expiration;
 
 
obtain new charters;
 
 
successfully interact with shipyards during periods of shipyard construction constraints;
 
 
obtain financing on commercially acceptable terms; or
 
 
maintain satisfactory relationships with suppliers and other third parties.
 
If our ability to do any of the things described above is impaired, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition and our ability to make cash distributions.
 
Our growth depends on continued growth in demand for refined products and crude oil and the continued demand for seaborne transportation of refined products and crude oil.
 
Our growth strategy focuses on expansion in the refined product tanker and crude oil shipping sector. Accordingly, our growth depends on continued growth in world and regional demand for refined products and crude oil and the transportation of refined products and crude oil by sea, which could be negatively affected by a number of factors, including:
 
 
fluctuations in the actual or projected price of refined products and crude oil;
 
 
refining capacity and its geographical location;
 
 
increases in the production of oil in areas linked by pipelines to consuming areas, the extension of existing, or the development of new, pipeline systems in markets we may serve, or the conversion of existing non-oil pipelines to oil pipelines in those markets;
 
 
 
 
 
decreases in the consumption of oil due to increases in its price relative to other energy sources, other factors making consumption of oil less attractive or energy conservation measures;
 
 
availability of new, alternative energy sources; and
 
 
negative or deteriorating global or regional economic or political conditions, particularly in oil consuming regions, which could reduce energy consumption or its growth.
 
Reduced demand for refined products and crude oil and the shipping of refined products or crude oil or the increased availability of pipelines used to transport refined products or crude oil, would have a material adverse effect on our future growth and could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
Our growth depends on our ability to expand relationships with existing customers and obtain new customers, for which we will face substantial competition.
 
Medium to long-term time charters and bareboat charters have the potential to provide income at pre-determined rates over more extended periods of time. However, the process for obtaining longer term time charters and bareboat charters is highly competitive and generally involves a lengthy, intensive and continuous screening and vetting process and the submission of competitive bids that often extends for several months. In addition to the quality, age and suitability of the vessel, longer term shipping contracts tend to be awarded based upon a variety of other factors relating to the vessel operator further described below under “Our vessels’ present and future employment could be adversely affected by an inability to clear the oil majors’ risk assessment process”.
 
In addition to having to meet the stringent requirements set out by charterers, it is likely that we will also face substantial competition from a number of competitors who may have greater financial resources, stronger reputation or experience than we do when we try to recharter our vessels. It is also likely that we will face increased numbers of competitors entering into our transportation sectors, including in the ice class sector. Increased competition may cause greater price competition, especially for medium to long-term charters.
 
As a result of these factors, we may be unable to expand our relationships with existing customers or obtain new customers for medium to long-term time charters or bareboat charters on a profitable basis, if at all. However, even if we are successful in employing our vessels under longer term time charters or bareboat charters, our vessels will not be available for trading in the spot market during an upturn in the tanker market cycle, when spot trading may be more profitable. If we cannot successfully employ our vessels in profitable time charters, our results of operations and operating cash flow could be adversely affected.
 
Our vessels’ present and future employment could be adversely affected by an inability to clear the oil majors’ risk assessment process.
 
Shipping, and especially crude oil, refined product and chemical tankers have been, and will remain, heavily regulated. The so called “oil majors companies”, together with a number of commodities traders, represent a significant percentage of the production, trading and shipping logistics (terminals) of crude oil and refined products world-wide. Concerns for the environment have led the oil majors to develop and implement a strict ongoing due diligence process when selecting their commercial partners. This vetting process has evolved into a sophisticated and comprehensive risk assessment of both the vessel operator and the vessel, including physical ship inspections, completion of vessel inspection questionnaires performed by accredited inspectors and the production of comprehensive risk assessment reports. In the case of term charter relationships, additional factors are considered when awarding such contracts, including:
 
 
 •
office assessments of the vessel operator, including extensive annual office audits;
 
 
the operator’s environmental, health and safety record;
 
 
compliance with the standards of the International Maritime Organization ("IMO"), a United Nations agency that issues international trade standards for shipping;
 
 
compliance with heightened industry standards that have been set by some energy companies;
 
 
shipping industry relationships, reputation for customer service, technical and operating expertise;
 
 
shipping experience and quality of ship operations, including cost-effectiveness;
 
 
quality, experience and technical capability of crews;
 
 
the ability to finance vessels at competitive rates and overall financial stability;
 
 
relationships with shipyards and the ability to obtain suitable berths;
 
 
 
 
 
construction management experience, including the ability to procure on-time delivery of new vessels according to customer specifications;
 
 
willingness to accept operational risks pursuant to the charter, such as allowing termination of the charter for force majeure events; and
 
 
competitiveness of the bid in terms of overall price.
 
Should Capital Maritime and Capital Ship Management not continue to successfully clear the oil majors’ risk assessment processes on an ongoing basis, our vessels’ present and future employment as well as our relationship with our existing charterers and our ability to obtain new charterers, whether medium or long-term, could be adversely affected. Such a situation may lead to the oil majors’ terminating existing charters and refusing to use our vessels in the future which would adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows. Please read “Item 4: Information on the Partnership—Major Oil Company Vetting Process” for more information regarding this process.
 
We may be unable to make or realize expected benefits from acquisitions, and implementing our growth strategy through acquisitions may harm our business, financial condition and operating results.
 
Our growth strategy focuses on a gradual expansion of our fleet. Any acquisition of a vessel may not be profitable to us at or after the time we acquire it and may not generate cash flow sufficient to justify our investment. In addition, our growth strategy exposes us to risks that may harm our business, financial condition and operating results, including risks that we may:
 
 
fail to realize anticipated benefits, such as new customer relationships, cost-savings or cash flow enhancements;
 
 
be unable to hire, train or retain qualified shore and seafaring personnel to manage and operate our growing business and fleet;
 
 
decrease our liquidity by using a significant portion of our available cash or borrowing capacity to finance acquisitions;
 
 
significantly increase our interest expense or financial leverage if we incur additional debt to finance acquisitions;
 
 
incur or assume unanticipated liabilities, losses or costs associated with the business or vessels acquired; or
 
 
incur other significant charges, such as impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets, asset devaluation or restructuring charges.
 
Unlike newbuildings, existing vessels typically do not carry warranties as to their condition. While we generally inspect existing vessels prior to purchase, such an inspection would normally not provide us with as much knowledge of a vessel’s condition as we would possess if it had been built for us and operated by us during its life. Repairs and maintenance costs for existing vessels are difficult to predict and may be substantially higher than for vessels we have operated since they were built. These costs could decrease our cash flow and reduce our liquidity.
 
The vessels that currently make up our fleet, as well as the six vessels we may purchase from Capital Maritime under our omnibus agreement, have been, or will be, built in accordance with custom designs from three different shipyards, and the vessels from each respective shipyard are the same in all material respects. As a result, any latent defect discovered in one vessel will likely affect all of our vessels.
 
The vessels that make up our existing and contracted fleet, with the exception of the M/T Amore Mio II, as well as the six vessels in Capital Maritime’s fleet for which we have been granted a right of first offer, are, or will be, based on standard designs from Hyundai MIPO Dockyard Co., Ltd., South Korea, STX Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., South Korea and Baima Shipyard, China, and have been customized by Capital Maritime, in some cases in consultation with the charterers of the vessel, and are, or will be, uniform in all material respects. As a result, any latent design defect discovered in one of our vessels will likely affect all of our other vessels in that class. In addition, the remaining vessels we have agreed to acquire have, or will have, the same or similar equipment. As a result, any equipment defect discovered may affect all of our vessels. Any disruptions in the operation of our vessels resulting from defects could adversely affect our receipt of revenues under the charters for the vessels affected.
 
Certain design features in our vessels have been modified by Capital Maritime to enhance the commercial capability of our vessels and have not yet been tested. As a result, we may encounter unforeseen expenses, complications, delays and other unknown factors which could adversely affect our revenues.
 
Capital Maritime has modified certain design features in our vessels which have not yet been tested and as a result, they may not operate as intended. If these modifications fail to enhance the commercial capability of our vessels as intended or interfere with the operation of our vessels, we could face expensive and time-consuming design modifications, delays in the operation of our vessels, damaged customer relationships and harm to our reputation. Any disruptions in the operation of our vessels resulting from the design modifications could adversely affect our receipt of revenues under the charters for the vessels affected.
 
 
 
 
Terrorist attacks, increased hostilities or war could lead to further economic instability, increased costs and disruption of our business.
 
Terrorist attacks, such as the attacks that occurred in the United States on September 11, 2001, the bombings in Spain on March 11, 2004, the bombings in London on July 7, 2005, and the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and other current and future conflicts, may adversely affect our business, operating results, financial condition, ability to raise capital and future growth. Continuing hostilities in the Middle East may lead to additional armed conflicts or to further acts of terrorism and civil disturbance in the United States or elsewhere, which may contribute further to economic instability and disruption of oil production and distribution, which could result in reduced demand for our services.
 
In addition, oil facilities, shipyards, vessels, pipelines and oil and gas fields could be targets of future terrorist attacks. Any such attacks could lead to, among other things, bodily injury or loss of life, vessel or other property damage, increased vessel operational costs, including insurance costs, and the inability to transport oil and other refined products to or from certain locations. Terrorist attacks, war or other events beyond our control that adversely affect the distribution, production or transportation of oil and other refined products to be shipped by us could entitle our customers to terminate our charter contracts, which would harm our cash flow and our business.
 
Our operations expose us to political and governmental instability, which could harm our business.
 
Our operations may be adversely affected by changing or adverse political and governmental conditions in the countries where our vessels are flagged or registered and in the regions where we otherwise engage in business. Any disruption caused by these factors may interfere with the operation of our vessels, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. In particular, we derive a substantial portion of our revenues from shipping oil and oil products from politically unstable regions. Past political efforts to disrupt shipping in these regions, particularly in the Arabian Gulf, have included attacks on ships and mining of waterways. In addition to acts of terrorism, trading in this and other regions has also been subject, in limited instances, to piracy. Our operations may also be adversely affected by expropriation of vessels, taxes, regulation, tariffs, trade embargoes, economic sanctions or a disruption of or limit to trading activities, or other adverse events or circumstances in or affecting the countries and regions where we operate or where we may operate in the future.
 
Marine transportation is inherently risky, and an incident involving significant loss of, or environmental contamination by, any of our vessels could harm our reputation and business.
 
Our vessels and their cargoes are at risk of being damaged or lost because of events such as:
 
 
marine disasters;
 
 
bad weather;
 
 
mechanical failures;
 
 
grounding, fire, explosions and collisions;
 
 
piracy;
 
 
human error; and
 
 
war and terrorism.
 
An accident involving any of our vessels could result in any of the following:
 
 
environmental damage, including potential liabilities or costs to recover any spilled oil or other petroleum products and to restore the ecosystem where the spill occurred;
 
 
death or injury to persons, loss of property;
 
 
delays in the delivery of cargo;
 
 
loss of revenues from or termination of charter contracts;
 
 
governmental fines, penalties or restrictions on conducting business;
 
 
higher insurance rates; and
 
 
damage to our reputation and customer relationships generally.
 
 
Any of these results could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.
 
 
 
 
Our insurance may be insufficient to cover losses that may occur to our property or result from our operations.
 
The operation of ocean-going vessels in international trade is inherently risky. Although we carry protection and indemnity insurance, all risks may not be adequately insured against, and any particular claim may not be paid. We do not currently maintain off-hire insurance, which would cover the loss of revenue during extended vessel off-hire periods, such as those that occur during an unscheduled drydocking due to damage to the vessel from accidents. Accordingly, any extended vessel off-hire, due to an accident or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business and our ability to pay distributions to our unitholders. Any claims covered by insurance would be subject to deductibles, and since it is possible that a large number of claims may be brought, the aggregate amount of these deductibles could be material. Certain of our insurance coverage is maintained through mutual protection and indemnity associations, and as a member of such associations we may be required to make additional payments over and above budgeted premiums if member claims exceed association reserves.
 
We may be unable to procure adequate insurance coverage at commercially reasonable rates in the future. For example, more stringent environmental regulations have led in the past to increased costs for, and in the future may result in the lack of availability of, insurance against risks of environmental damage or pollution. A catastrophic oil spill or marine disaster could exceed our insurance coverage, which could harm our business, financial condition and operating results. In addition, certain of our vessels are under bareboat charters with BP Shipping Limited and subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. Under the terms of these charters, the charterer provides for the insurance of the vessel and as a result these vessels may not be adequately insured and/or in some cases may be self-insured. Any uninsured or underinsured loss could harm our business and financial condition. In addition, our insurance may be voidable by the insurers as a result of certain of our actions, such as our ships failing to maintain certification with applicable maritime self-regulatory organizations.
 
Changes in the insurance markets attributable to terrorist attacks may also make certain types of insurance more difficult for us to obtain. In addition, the insurance that may be available to us may be significantly more expensive than our existing coverage.
 
The maritime transportation industry is subject to substantial environmental and other regulations, which may significantly limit our operations or increase our expenses.
 
Our operations are affected by extensive and changing international, national and local environmental protection laws, regulations, treaties, conventions and standards in force in international waters, the jurisdictional waters of the countries in which our vessels operate, as well as the countries of our vessels’ registration. Many of these requirements are designed to reduce the risk of oil spills and other pollution, and our compliance with these requirements can be costly.
 
These requirements can affect the resale value or useful lives of our vessels, require a reduction in cargo-capacity, ship modifications or operational changes or restrictions, lead to decreased availability of insurance coverage for environmental matters or result in the denial of access to certain jurisdictional waters or ports, or detention in certain ports. Under local, national and foreign laws, as well as international treaties and conventions, we could incur material liabilities, including cleanup obligations, in the event that there is a release of petroleum or other hazardous substances from our vessels or otherwise in connection with our operations. We could also become subject to personal injury or property damage claims relating to the release of or exposure to hazardous materials associated with our current or historic operations. Violations of or liabilities under environmental requirements also can result in substantial penalties, fines and other sanctions, including, in certain instances, seizure or detention of our vessels.
 
We could incur significant costs, including cleanup costs, fines, penalties, third-party claims and natural resource damages, as the result of an oil spill or other liabilities under environmental laws. The United States Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ("OPA 90") affects all vessel owners shipping oil or petroleum products to, from or within the United States. OPA 90 allows for potentially unlimited liability without regard to fault of owners, operators and bareboat charterers of vessels for oil pollution in U.S. waters. Similarly, the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1969, as amended, which has been adopted by most countries outside of the U.S., imposes liability for oil pollution in international waters. OPA 90 expressly permits individual states to impose their own liability regimes with regard to hazardous materials and oil pollution incidents occurring within their boundaries. Coastal states in the U.S. have enacted pollution prevention liability and response laws, many providing for unlimited liability.
 
In addition to complying with OPA 90, IMO regulations, such as Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, EU directives and other existing laws and regulations and those that may be adopted, shipowners may incur significant additional costs in meeting new maintenance and inspection requirements, in developing contingency arrangements for potential spills and in obtaining insurance coverage. Government regulation of vessels, particularly in the areas of safety and environmental requirements, can be expected to become stricter in the future and require us to incur significant capital expenditure on our vessels to keep them in compliance, or even to scrap or sell certain vessels altogether. For example, draft amendments to revise the regulations of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships ("MARPOL") regarding the prevention of air pollution from ships were agreed by the IMO Sub-Committee on Bulk Liquids and Gases when it met for its 12th session. Following lengthy and technically challenging discussions in the Air Pollution Working Group, the Sub-Committee agreed a draft revised Annex VI to the MARPOL Convention and amendments to the NOx Technical Code. These will now be submitted to the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), which meets for its 57th session from March 31 to April 4, 2008.
 
 
 
 
A number of options remain open for discussion at the MEPC, which is expected to approve the amendments prior to their formal adoption at MEPC 58 in October 2008. The amendments would then enter into force, under the tacit acceptance procedure, 16 months later, in March 2010, or on a date to be decided by the MEPC. Given the significant environmental, human health, and economic consequences of a decision on how best to further reduce emissions of sulphur oxide (SOx) and particulate matter from ships, the Sub-Committee decided that relevant policy decisions should be taken at the Committee level and that its principal duty was to initiate such discussions.

Further legislation applicable to international and national maritime trade is expected over the coming years in areas such as ship recycling, sewage systems, emission control, ballast treatment and handling, etc. This new legislation may require additional capital expenditure in order to maintain our vessels’ compliance with international and/or national regulations.

Additionally, various jurisdictions are considering regulating the management of ballast water to prevent the introduction of non-indigenous species considered to be invasive. Further to that and as a result of marine accidents (such as the November 2002 oil spill from the motor tanker Prestige, a 26 year-old single-hull tanker  - which was owned by a company unrelated to us), we believe that regulation of the shipping industry will continue to become more stringent and more expensive for us and our competitors. In recent years, the IMO and EU have both accelerated their existing non-double-hull phase-out schedules in response to highly publicized oil spills and other shipping incidents involving companies unrelated to us. Future incidents may result in the adoption of even stricter laws and regulations, which could limit our operations or our ability to do business and which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results. Please read “Item 4: Business Overview—Regulation”.
 
We have a limited history operating as a publicly traded entity.
 
We completed our initial public offering on the Nasdaq Global Market on April 3, 2007 and have a limited history operating as a publicly traded entity. As a publicly traded limited partnership, we are required to comply with the SEC’s reporting requirements and with corporate governance and related requirements of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the SEC and the Nasdaq Global Market, on which our common units are listed. Section 404 of the Sarbanes−Oxley Act requires that we evaluate and determine the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. However, as a newly public non−accelerated filer, we are not subject to this requirement for the first year of our operations. Currently, we would be subject to such requirement by the end of our fiscal year ending December 31, 2008. If we have a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting, we may not detect errors on a timely basis and our financial statements may be materially misstated. We will have to dedicate a significant amount of time and resources to ensure compliance with the regulatory requirements of Section 404. We will continue to work with our legal, accounting and financial advisors to identify any areas in which changes should be made to our financial and management control systems to manage our growth and our obligations as a public company. However, these and other measures we may take may not be sufficient to allow us to satisfy our obligations as a public company on a timely and reliable basis. We have incurred and will continue to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses in complying with these and other applicable regulations. We anticipate that our incremental general and administrative expenses as a publicly traded limited partnership taxed as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes will include costs associated with annual reports to unitholders, tax returns, investor relations, registrar and transfer agent’s fees, incremental director and officer liability insurance costs and director compensation.
 
The crew employment agreements manning agents enter into on behalf of Capital Maritime or its affiliates may not prevent labor interruptions and the failure to renegotiate these agreements successfully in the future may disrupt our operations and adversely affect our cash flows.
 
The crew employment agreements that manning agents enter into on behalf of Capital Maritime or its affiliates may not prevent labor interruptions and are subject to renegotiation in the future. Any labor interruptions, including due to a failure to renegotiate employment agreements with our crew members successfully, could disrupt our operations and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
A global economic slowdown could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations.
 
Oil has been one of the world’s primary energy sources for a number of decades. Global economic growth has been strong in recent years which has had a significant impact on shipping demand.  However, such growth may not be sustained or the global economy may experience negative growth in the near future. Such an economic downturn may sharply reduce the demand for oil and refined petroleum products, and also potentially affect tanker demand. Even though our vessels are chartered under medium or long-term charters, a negative change in global economic conditions will likely have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and ability to pay dividends, as well as our future prospects.
 
 
 
 
Risks Inherent in an Investment in Us
 
Capital Maritime and its affiliates may engage in competition with us.
 
Pursuant to the omnibus agreement that we and Capital Maritime have entered into, Capital Maritime and its controlled affiliates (other than us, our general partner and our subsidiaries) generally will agree not to acquire, own or operate medium range tankers under time charters of two or more years without the consent of our general partner. The omnibus agreement, however, contains significant exceptions that may allow Capital Maritime or any of its controlled affiliates to compete with us, which could harm our business.  Please read “Item 7B: Related Party Transactions—Omnibus Agreement—Noncompetition.”
 
Unitholders have limited voting rights and our partnership agreement restricts the voting rights of unitholders owning 5% or more of our common units.
 
Holders of common units have only limited voting rights on matters affecting our business. We will hold a meeting of the limited partners every year to elect one or more members of our board of directors and to vote on any other matters that are properly brought before the meeting. Common unitholders elect only four of the seven members of our board of directors. The elected directors will be elected on a staggered basis and will serve for three-year terms. Our general partner in its sole discretion has the right to appoint the remaining three directors and to set the terms for which those directors will serve. The partnership agreement also contains provisions limiting the ability of unitholders to call meetings or to acquire information about our operations, as well as other provisions limiting the unitholders’ ability to influence the manner or direction of management. Unitholders will have no right to elect our general partner and our general partner may not be removed except by a vote of the holders of at least 66% of the outstanding units, including any units owned by our general partner and its affiliates, voting together as a single class and a majority vote of our board of directors.
 
Our partnership agreement further restricts unitholders’ voting rights by providing that if any person or group, other than our general partner, its affiliates, their transferees and persons who acquired such units with the prior approval of our board of directors, owns beneficially 5% or more of any class of units then outstanding, any such units owned by that person or group in excess of 4.9% may not be voted on any matter and will not be considered to be outstanding when sending notices of a meeting of unitholders, calculating required votes, except for purposes of nominating a person for election to our board, determining the presence of a quorum or for other similar purposes, unless required by law. The voting rights of any such unitholders in excess of 4.9% will be redistributed pro rata among the other common unitholders holding less than 4.9% of the voting power of all classes of units entitled to vote.
 
Our general partner and its other affiliates own a controlling interest in us and have conflicts of interest and limited fiduciary and contractual duties, which may permit them to favor their own interests to your detriment.
 
As of March 31, 2008, Capital Maritime owned a 45.6% interest in us, including a 2% interest through its ownership of our general partner which effectively controls our day-to-day affairs consistent with policies and procedures adopted by and subject to the direction of our board of directors. Although our general partner and its affiliates and our directors have a fiduciary duty to manage us in a manner beneficial to us and our unitholders, the officers of our general partner have a fiduciary duty to manage our general partner in a manner beneficial to Capital Maritime. Furthermore, all of the officers of our general partner and certain of our directors are directors or officers of Capital Maritime and its affiliates, and as such they have fiduciary duties to Capital Maritime that may cause them to pursue business strategies that disproportionately benefit Capital Maritime or which otherwise are not in the best interests of us or our unitholders. Conflicts of interest may arise between Capital Maritime and its affiliates, including our general partner and its officers, on the one hand, and us and our unitholders, on the other hand. As a result of these conflicts, our general partner and its affiliates may favor their own interests over the interests of our unitholders. Please read “—Our partnership agreement limits the fiduciary duties of our general partner and our directors to our unitholders and restricts the remedies available to unitholders for actions taken by our general partner or our directors” below. These conflicts include, among others, the following situations:
 
 
neither our partnership agreement nor any other agreement requires our general partner or Capital Maritime or its affiliates to pursue a business strategy that favors us or utilizes our assets, and Capital Maritime’s officers and directors have a fiduciary duty to make decisions in the best interests of the unitholders of Capital Maritime, which may be contrary to our interests;
 
 
the executive officers of our general partner and three of our directors also serve as executive officers and/or directors of Capital Maritime;
 
 
our general partner and our board of directors are allowed to take into account the interests of parties other than us, such as Capital Maritime, in resolving conflicts of interest, which has the effect of limiting their fiduciary duties to our unitholders;
 
 
 
 
 
our general partner and our directors have limited their liabilities and reduced their fiduciary duties under the laws of the Marshall Islands, while also restricting the remedies available to our unitholders, and, as a result of purchasing common units, unitholders are treated as having agreed to the modified standard of fiduciary duties and to certain actions that may be taken by our general partner and our directors, all as set forth in the partnership agreement;
 
 
our general partner and our board of directors will be involved in determining the amount and timing of our asset purchases and sales, capital expenditures, borrowings, and issuances of additional partnership securities and reserves, each of which can affect the amount of cash that is available for distribution to our unitholders;
 
 
our general partner may have substantial influence over our board of directors’ decision to cause us to borrow funds in order to permit the payment of cash distributions, even if the purpose or effect of the borrowing is to make a distribution on the subordinated units or to make incentive distributions or to accelerate the expiration of the subordination period;
 
 
our general partner is entitled to reimbursement of all reasonable costs incurred by it and its affiliates for our benefit;
 
 
our partnership agreement does not restrict us from paying our general partner or its affiliates for any services rendered to us on terms that are fair and reasonable or entering into additional contractual arrangements with any of these entities on our behalf; and
 
 
our general partner may exercise its right to call and purchase our common units if it and its affiliates own more than 80% of our common units.
 
Although a majority of our directors will over time be elected by common unitholders, our general partner will likely have substantial influence on decisions made by our board of directors. Please read “Item 7B:  Related Party Transactions”.
 
We currently do not have any officers and expect to rely solely on officers of our general partner, who face conflicts in the allocation of their time to our business.
 
We do not currently expect our board of directors to exercise its power to appoint officers of Capital Product Partners L.P. and, as a result, we expect to rely solely on the officers of our general partner, who are not required to work full-time on our affairs and who also work for affiliates of our general partner, including Capital Maritime. For example, our general partner’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer is also an executive officer of Capital Maritime. The affiliates of our general partner conduct substantial businesses and activities of their own in which we have no economic interest. As a result, there could be material competition for the time and effort of the officers of our general partner who also provide services to our general partner’s affiliates, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
Our partnership agreement limits our general partner’s and our directors’ fiduciary duties to our unitholders and restricts the remedies available to unitholders for actions taken by our general partner or our directors.
 
Our partnership agreement contains provisions that reduce the standards to which our general partner and directors would otherwise be held by Marshall Islands law.  For example, our partnership agreement:
 
 
permits our general partner to make a number of decisions in its individual capacity, as opposed to in its capacity as our general partner. Where our partnership agreement permits, our general partner may consider only the interests and factors that it desires, and in such cases it has no duty or obligation to give any consideration to any interest of, or factors affecting us, our affiliates or our unitholders. Decisions made by our general partner in its individual capacity will be made by its sole owner, Capital Maritime. Specifically, pursuant to our partnership agreement, our general partner will be considered to be acting in its individual capacity if it exercises its call right, pre-emptive rights or registration rights, consents or withholds consent to any merger or consolidation of the partnership, appoints any directors or votes for the election of any director, votes or refrains from voting on amendments to our partnership agreement that require a vote of the outstanding units, voluntarily withdraws from the partnership, transfers (to the extent permitted under our partnership agreement) or refrains from transferring its units, general partner interest or incentive distribution rights or votes upon the dissolution of the partnership;
 
 
provides that our general partner and our directors are entitled to make other decisions in “good faith” if they reasonably believe that the decision is in our best interests;
 
 
generally provides that affiliated transactions and resolutions of conflicts of interest not approved by the conflicts committee of our board of directors and not involving a vote of unitholders must be on terms no less favorable to us than those generally being provided to or available from unrelated third parties or be “fair and reasonable” to us and that, in determining whether a transaction or resolution is “fair and reasonable,” our board of directors may consider the totality of the relationships between the parties involved, including other transactions that may be particularly advantageous or beneficial to us; and
 
 
 
 
 
provides that neither our general partner and its officers nor our directors will be liable for monetary damages to us, our limited partners or assignees for any acts or omissions unless there has been a final and non-appealable judgment entered by a court of competent jurisdiction determining that our general partner or directors or its officers or directors or those other persons engaged in actual fraud or willful misconduct.
 
In order to become a limited partner of our partnership, a common unitholder is required to agree to be bound by the provisions in the partnership agreement, including the provisions discussed above.
 
Fees and cost reimbursements, which Capital Ship Management will determine for services provided to us and certain of our subsidiaries, will be substantial, may fluctuate, and will reduce our cash available for distribution to you. Such fees and cost reimbursements may change upon the expiration of the management and administrative agreements currently in place.
 
We pay a fixed daily fee for an initial term of approximately five years from the time we take delivery of each vessel for services provided to us by Capital Ship Management, and we reimburse Capital Ship Management for all expenses it incurs on our behalf. The fixed daily fee to be paid to Capital Ship Management includes all costs incurred in providing certain commercial and technical management services to us, including vessel maintenance, crewing, purchasing and insurance and also includes the expenses for each vessel’s next scheduled special or intermediate survey, as applicable, and related drydocking.  In addition to the fixed daily fees payable under the management agreement, Capital Ship Management is entitled to reasonable supplementary remuneration for extraordinary fees and costs of any direct and indirect expenses it incurs in providing these services which may vary from time to time.  In addition, Capital Ship Management provides us with administrative services, including audit, legal, banking and insurance services, pursuant to an administrative services agreement with an initial term of five years from the date of our initial public offering, and we reimburse Capital Ship Management for all costs and expenses reasonably incurred by it in connection with the provision of those services. Costs for these services are not fixed and may fluctuate depending on our requirements.
 
Going forward, when we acquire new vessels or when the respective management agreements for our vessels expire, we will have to enter into new agreements with Capital Ship Management or a third party for the provision of the above services. It is possible that any such new agreement may not be on the same or similar terms as our existing agreements, and that the level of our operating costs may change following any such renewal. Any increase in the costs and expenses associated with the provision of these services by our manager in the future, such as the costs of crews for our time-chartered vessels and insurance, will lead to an increase in the fees we will have to pay to Capital Ship Management under any new agreements we enter into. The payment of fees to Capital Ship Management and reimbursement of expenses to Capital Ship Management could adversely affect our ability to pay cash distributions.
 
Our partnership agreement contains provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a person or group from attempting to remove our current management or our general partner, and even if public unitholders are dissatisfied, they will be unable to remove our general partner without Capital Maritime’s consent, unless Capital Maritime’s ownership share in us is decreased, all of which could diminish the trading price of our common units.
 
Our partnership agreement contains provisions that may have the effect of discouraging a person or group from attempting to remove our current management or our general partner.
 
 
The unitholders will be unable to remove our general partner without its consent because our general partner and its affiliates own sufficient units to be able to prevent its removal. The vote of the holders of at least 66% of all outstanding units voting together as a single class and a majority vote of our board of directors is required to remove the general partner. As of March 31, 2008, Capital Maritime owned a 45.6% interest in us, including a 2% interest through its ownership of our general partner.
 
 
If our general partner is removed without “cause” during the subordination period and units held by our general partner and Capital Maritime are not voted in favor of that removal, all remaining subordinated units will automatically convert into common units and any existing arrearages on the common units will be extinguished. A removal of our general partner under these circumstances would adversely affect the common units by prematurely eliminating their distribution and liquidation preference over the subordinated units, which would otherwise have continued until we had met certain distribution and performance tests. “Cause” is narrowly defined to mean that a court of competent jurisdiction has entered a final, non-appealable judgment finding our general partner liable for actual fraud or willful or wanton misconduct in its capacity as our general partner. Cause does not include most cases of charges of poor management of the business, so the removal of our general partner because of the unitholders’ dissatisfaction with the general partner’s performance in managing our partnership will most likely result in the termination of the subordination period.
 
 
Common unitholders elect only four of the seven members of our board of directors. Our general partner in its sole discretion has the right to appoint the remaining three directors.
 
 
 
 
 
Election of the four directors elected by unitholders is staggered, meaning that the members of only one of three classes of our elected directors are selected each year. In addition, the directors appointed by our general partner will serve for terms determined by our general partner.
 
 
Our partnership agreement contains provisions limiting the ability of unitholders to call meetings of unitholders, to nominate directors and to acquire information about our operations as well as other provisions limiting the unitholders’ ability to influence the manner or direction of management.
 
 
Unitholders’ voting rights are further restricted by the partnership agreement provision providing that if any person or group, other than our general partner, its affiliates, their transferees, and persons who acquired such units with the prior approval of our board of directors, owns beneficially 5% or more of any class of units then outstanding, any such units owned by that person or group in excess of 4.9% may not be voted on any matter and will not be considered to be outstanding when sending notices of a meeting of unitholders, calculating required votes, except for purposes of nominating a person for election to our board, determining the presence of a quorum or for other similar purposes, unless required by law. The voting rights of any such unitholders in excess of 4.9% will be redistributed pro rata among the other common unitholders holding less than 4.9% of the voting power of all classes of units entitled to vote.
 
 
We have substantial latitude in issuing equity securities without unitholder approval.
 
The effect of these provisions may be to diminish the price at which the common units will trade.
 
The control of our general partner may be transferred to a third party without unitholder consent.
 
Our general partner may transfer its general partner interest to a third party in a merger or in a sale of all or substantially all of its assets without the consent of the unitholders. In addition, our partnership agreement does not restrict the ability of the members of our general partner from transferring their respective membership interests in our general partner to a third party. Any such change in control of our general partner may affect the way we and our operations are managed, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition and our ability to make cash distributions.
 
Substantial future sales of our common units in the public market could cause the price of our common units to fall.
 
We have granted registration rights to Capital Maritime and certain affiliates of Capital Maritime. These unitholders have the right, subject to some conditions, to require us to file registration statements covering any of our common, subordinated or other equity securities owned by them or to include those securities in registration statements that we may file for ourselves or other unitholders. As of March 31, 2008, Capital Maritime owned 2,007,847 common units, 8,805,522 subordinated units and certain incentive distribution rights. Following their registration and sale under the applicable registration statement, the subordinated units will become freely tradeable. By exercising their registration rights and selling a large number of common units or other securities, these unitholders could cause the price of our common units to decline.
 
We may issue additional equity securities without your approval, which would dilute your ownership interests.
 
We may, without the approval of our unitholders, issue an unlimited number of additional units or other equity securities, including securities to Capital Maritime. In particular, we have financed a portion of the purchase price of the non-contracted vessel we acquired from Capital Maritime during the first quarter of 2008 through the issuance of additional common units to Capital Maritime and we may finance a substantial portion of the purchase price of the remaining newbuildings to be delivered in 2008 through the issuance of additional common units.
 
The issuance by us of additional common units or other equity securities of equal or senior rank will have the following effects:
 
 
our unitholders’ proportionate ownership interest in us will decrease;
 
 
the amount of cash available for distribution on each unit may decrease;
 
 
because a lower percentage of total outstanding units will be subordinated units, the risk that a shortfall in the payment of the quarterly distribution will be borne by our common unitholders will increase;
 
 
the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding unit may be diminished; and
 
 
the market price of the common units may decline.
 
 
 
 
In establishing cash reserves, our board of directors may reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to you.
 
Our partnership agreement requires our general partner to deduct from operating surplus cash reserves that it determines are necessary to fund our future operating expenditures. These reserves will also affect the amount of cash available for distribution to our unitholders. Our board of directors may establish reserves for distributions on the subordinated units, but only if those reserves will not prevent us from distributing the full quarterly distribution, plus any arrearages, on the common units for the following four quarters. As described above in “—Risks Inherent in Our Business—We must make substantial capital expenditures to maintain the operating capacity of our fleet, which will reduce our cash available for distribution. In addition, each quarter our board of directors is required to deduct estimated maintenance and replacement capital expenditures from operating surplus, which may result in less cash available to unitholders than if actual maintenance and replacement capital expenditures were deducted.” Our partnership agreement requires our board of directors each quarter to deduct from operating surplus estimated maintenance and replacement capital expenditures, as opposed to actual expenditures, which could reduce the amount of available cash for distribution. The amount of estimated maintenance and replacement capital expenditures deducted from operating surplus is subject to review and change by our board of directors at least once a year, provided that any change must be approved by the conflicts committee of our board of directors.
 
Our general partner has a limited call right that may require you to sell your common units at an undesirable time or price.
 
If at any time our general partner and its affiliates own more than 80% of the common units, our general partner will have the right, which it may assign to any of its affiliates or to us, but not the obligation, to acquire all, but not less than all, of the common units held by unaffiliated persons at a price not less than their then-current market price. As a result, you may be required to sell your common units at an undesirable time or price and may not receive any return on your investment. You may also incur a tax liability upon a sale of your units.
 
As of March 31, 2008, Capital Maritime, an affiliate of our general partner, owned 12.9% of our common units. At the end of the subordination period, assuming no further issuances of common units and conversion of our subordinated units into common units, Capital Maritime will own 45.6% of our common units, including a 2% interest through its ownership of our general partner.
 
You may not have limited liability if a court finds that unitholder action constitutes control of our business.
 
As a limited partner in a partnership organized under the laws of the Marshall Islands, you could be held liable for our obligations to the same extent as a general partner if you participate in the “control” of our business. Our general partner generally has unlimited liability for the obligations of the partnership, such as its debts and environmental liabilities, except for those contractual obligations of the partnership that are expressly made without recourse to our general partner. In addition, the Marshall Islands Limited Partnership Act (the "Marshall Islands Act") provides that, under some circumstances, a unitholder may be liable to us for the amount of a distribution for a period of three years from the date of the distribution. In addition, the limitations on the liability of holders of limited partner interests for the obligations of a limited partnership have not been clearly established in some jurisdictions in which we do business. Please read “The Partnership Agreement—Limited Liability” for a discussion of the implications of the limitations on liability to a unitholder.
 
We can borrow money to pay distributions, which would reduce the amount of credit available to operate our business.
 
Our partnership agreement will allow us to make working capital borrowings to pay distributions. Accordingly, we can make distributions on all our units even though cash generated by our operations may not be sufficient to pay such distributions. Any working capital borrowings by us to make distributions will reduce the amount of working capital borrowings we can make for operating our business. For more information, please read “Item 5: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Arrangements.”
 
Increases in interest rates may cause the market price of our common units to decline.
 
An increase in interest rates may cause a corresponding decline in demand for equity investments in general, and in particular for yield-based equity investments such as our common units. Any such increase in interest rates or reduction in demand for our common units resulting from other relatively more attractive investment opportunities may cause the trading price of our common units to decline.
 
Unitholders may have liability to repay distributions.
 
Under some circumstances, unitholders may have to repay amounts wrongfully returned or distributed to them. Under the Marshall Islands Act, we may not make a distribution to you if the distribution would cause our liabilities to exceed the fair value of our assets. Marshall Islands law provides that for a period of three years from the date of the impermissible distribution, limited partners who received the distribution and who knew at the time of the distribution that it violated Marshall Islands law will be liable to the limited partnership for the distribution amount. Assignees who become substituted limited partners are liable for the obligations of the assignor to make contributions to the partnership that are known to the assignee at the time it became a limited partner and for unknown obligations if the liabilities could be determined from the partnership agreement. Liabilities to partners on account of their partnership interest and liabilities that are non-recourse to the partnership are not counted for purposes of determining whether a distribution is permitted.
 
 
 
 
We have been organized as a limited partnership under the laws of the Republic of The Marshall Islands, which does not have a well developed body of partnership law.
 
Our partnership affairs are governed by our partnership agreement and by the Marshall Islands Act. The provisions of the Marshall Islands Act resemble provisions of the limited partnership laws of a number of states in the United States, most notably Delaware. The Marshall Islands Act also provides that it is to be applied and construed to make it uniform with the Delaware Revised Uniform Partnership Act and, so long as it does not conflict with the Marshall Islands Act or decisions of the Marshall Islands courts, interpreted according to the non-statutory law (or case law) of the State of Delaware. There have been, however, few, if any, court cases in the Marshall Islands interpreting the Marshall Islands Act, in contrast to Delaware, which has a fairly well-developed body of case law interpreting its limited partnership statute. Accordingly, we cannot predict whether Marshall Islands courts would reach the same conclusions as the courts in Delaware. For example, the rights of our unitholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our general partner under Marshall Islands law are not as clearly established as under judicial precedent in existence in Delaware. As a result, unitholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions by our general partner and its officers and directors than would unitholders of a limited partnership formed in the United States.
 
Because we are organized under the laws of the Marshall Islands, it may be difficult to serve us with legal process or enforce judgments against us, our directors or our management.
 
We are organized under the laws of the Marshall Islands, and all of our assets are located outside of the United States. Our business is operated primarily from our office in Greece. In addition, our general partner is a Marshall Islands limited liability company and its directors and officers generally are or will be non-residents of the United States, and all or a substantial portion of the assets of these non-residents are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for you to bring an action against us or against these individuals in the United States if you believe that your rights have been infringed under securities laws or otherwise. Even if you are successful in bringing an action of this kind, the laws of the Marshall Islands and of other jurisdictions may prevent or restrict you from enforcing a judgment against our assets or the assets of our general partner or its directors and officers. For more information regarding the relevant laws of the Marshall Islands, please read “Service of Process and Enforcement of Civil Liabilities.”
 
Tax Risks
 
In addition to the following risk factors, you should read “Item 10E:—Taxation” for a more complete discussion of the expected material U.S. federal and non-U.S. income tax considerations relating to us and the ownership and disposition of common units.
 
U.S. tax authorities could treat us as a “passive foreign investment company,” which could have adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders.
 
A foreign entity taxed as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes will be treated as a “passive foreign investment company” (a “PFIC”) for U.S. federal income tax purposes if at least 75.0% of its gross income for any taxable year consists of certain types of “passive income,” or at least 50.0% of the average value of the entity’s assets produce or are held for the production of those types of “passive income.” For purposes of these tests, “passive income” includes dividends, interest, gains from the sale or exchange of investment property, and rents and royalties other than rents and royalties that are received from unrelated parties in connection with the active conduct of a trade or business. For purposes of these tests, income derived from the performance of services does not constitute “passive income.” U.S. shareholders of a PFIC are subject to a disadvantageous U.S. federal income tax regime with respect to the income derived by the PFIC, the distributions they receive from the PFIC, and the gain, if any, they derive from the sale or other disposition of their shares in the PFIC.
 
Based on our current and projected method of operation we do not believe that we were a PFIC for our 2006 or 2007 taxable years nor do we expect to become a PFIC with respect to any other taxable year. Twelve of the 15 vessels in our fleet as well as the M/T Aristofanis, which we intend to acquire during the second quarter of 2008, are or will be engaged in time chartering activities and we intend to treat our income from those activities as non-passive income, and the vessels engaged in those activities as non-passive assets, for PFIC purposes. However, no assurance can be given that the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) will accept this position. The remainder of our fleet will be engaged in activities that may be characterized as passive for PFIC purposes and the income from that portion of our fleet may be treated as passive income for PFIC purposes. See “Item 10E:—Taxation—PFIC Status and Significant Tax Consequences.”
 
 
 
 
The preferential tax rates applicable to qualified dividend income are temporary, and the enactment of previously proposed legislation could affect whether dividends paid by us constitute qualified dividend income eligible for the preferential rate.
 
Certain of our distributions may be treated as qualified dividend income eligible for preferential rates of U.S. federal income tax to U.S. individual unitholders (and certain other U.S. unitholders). In the absence of legislation extending the term for these preferential tax rates, all dividends received by such U.S. taxpayers in tax years beginning on January 1, 2011 or later will be taxed at ordinary graduated tax rates. Please read “Item 10E:—Taxation—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of U.S. Holders—Distributions.”
 
In addition, previously proposed legislation proposed during a preceding legislative session of the U.S. Congress would deny the preferential rate of U.S. federal income tax currently imposed on qualified dividend income with respect to dividends received from a non-U.S. corporation, unless the non-U.S. corporation either is eligible for benefits of a comprehensive income tax treaty with the United States or is created or organized under the laws of a foreign country that has a comprehensive income tax system. Because the Marshall Islands has not entered into a comprehensive income tax treaty with the United States and imposes only limited taxes on entities organized under its laws, it is unlikely that we could satisfy either of these requirements. Consequently, if this legislation were enacted the preferential tax rates of federal income tax discussed under “Item 10E:—Taxation—U.S. Federal Income Taxation of U.S. Holders—Distributions” may no longer be applicable to distributions received from us. As of the date hereof, it is not possible to predict with any certainty whether this previously proposed legislation will be reintroduced and enacted.
 
We may have to pay tax on United States source income, which would reduce our earnings.
 
Under the Code, 50% of the gross shipping income of a vessel-owning or chartering corporation that is attributable to transportation that both begins or ends, but that does not begin and end, in the U.S. is characterized as U.S. source shipping income and such income generally is subject to a 4% U.S. federal income tax without allowance for deduction, unless that corporation qualifies for exemption from tax under Section 883 of the Code.
 
We believe that  we and each of our subsidiaries will qualify for this statutory tax exemption, and we will take this position for U.S. federal income tax return reporting purposes. See “Item 10E:—Taxation.” However, there are factual circumstances, including some that may be beyond our control, which could cause us to lose the benefit of this tax exemption. In addition, our conclusion that we qualify for this exemption is based upon legal authorities that do not expressly contemplate an organization structure such as ours. Although we have elected to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, for corporate law purposes we are organized as a limited partnership under Marshall Islands law and our general partner will be responsible for managing our business and affairs and has been granted certain veto rights over decisions of our board of directors. Therefore, we can give no assurances that the IRS will not take a different position regarding our qualification, or the qualification of any of our subsidiaries, for this tax exemption.
 
If we or our subsidiaries are not entitled to this exemption under Section 883 for any taxable year, we or our subsidiaries generally would be subject for those years to a 4% U.S. federal gross income tax on our U.S. source shipping income. The imposition of this taxation could have a negative effect on our business and would result in decreased earnings available for distribution to our unitholders.
 
You may be subject to income tax in one or more non-U.S. countries, including Greece, as a result of owning our common units if, under the laws of any such country, we are considered to be carrying on business there. Such laws may require you to file a tax return with and pay taxes to those countries.
 
We intend that our affairs and the business of each of our controlled affiliates will be conducted and operated in a manner that minimizes income taxes imposed upon us and these controlled affiliates or which may be imposed upon you as a result of owning our common units. However, because we are organized as a partnership, there is a risk in some jurisdictions that our activities and the activities of our subsidiaries may be attributed to our unitholders for tax purposes and, thus, that you will be subject to tax in one or more non-U.S. countries, including Greece, as a result of owning our common units if, under the laws of any such country, we are considered to be carrying on business there. If you are subject to tax in any such country, you may be required to file a tax return with and to pay tax in that country based on your allocable share of our income. We may be required to reduce distributions to you on account of any withholding obligations imposed upon us by that country in respect of such allocation to you. The United States may not allow a tax credit for any foreign income taxes that you directly or indirectly incur.
 
We believe we can conduct our activities in a manner so that our unitholders should not be considered to be carrying on business in Greece solely as a consequence of the acquisition, holding, disposition or redemption of our common units. However, the question of whether either we or any of our controlled affiliates will be treated as carrying on business in any country, including Greece, will largely be a question of fact determined through an analysis of contractual arrangements, including the management agreement and the administrative services agreement we will enter into with Capital Ship Management, and the way we conduct business or operations, all of which may change over time. The laws of Greece or any other foreign country may also change, which could cause the country’s taxing authorities to determine that we are carrying on business in such country and are subject to its taxation laws. Any foreign taxes imposed on us or any subsidiaries will reduce our cash available for distribution.
 
 
 
 
Item 4. Information on the Partnership.
 
A. History and Development of the Partnership
 
We are a limited partnership incorporated as Capital Product Partners L.P. under the laws of the Marshall Islands on January 16, 2007 by Capital Maritime. On April 3, 2007, we completed our initial public offering (the “Offering”) on the Nasdaq Global Market of 13,512,500 common units at a price of $21.50 per unit. At the time of the Offering, Capital Maritime transferred all of the shares of eight wholly owned subsidiaries, each of which owned a newly built, double hull medium range product tanker, to us and we entered into an agreement with Capital Ship Management, a subsidiary of Capital Maritime, to provide management and technical services in connection with these and future vessels. As of March 31, 2008, Capital Maritime owned a 45.6% interest in us, including a 2% interest through its ownership of our general partner, Capital GP L.L.C. We maintain our principal executive headquarters at 3 Iassonos Street, Piraeus, 18537 Greece and our telephone number is +30 210 4584 950.
 
B. Business Overview
 
We are an international owner of product tankers formed by Capital Maritime, an international shipping company with a long history of operating and investing in the shipping market. Our fleet currently consists of 15 double-hull, high specification tankers including the largest Ice Class 1A medium range (MR) product tanker fleet in the world based on number of vessels and carrying capacity. Since the Offering we have taken delivery of five newbuildings and have also acquired two additional vessels from Capital Maritime, almost doubling the size of our fleet in terms of carrying capacity. We also expect to take delivery of an additional 12,000 dwt small tanker from Capital Maritime during the second quarter of 2008 and of two additional newbuildings in June and August of 2008 which we contracted to acquire from Capital Maritime prior to our Offering. Our vessels are capable of carrying crude oil, refined oil products, such as gasoline, diesel, fuel oil and jet fuel, as well as edible oils and certain chemicals such as ethanol and comply not only with the strict regulatory standards that are currently in place but also with the stricter regulatory standards that are currently expected to be implemented. We charter our vessels under medium to long-term time and bareboat charters (two to 10 years, with an average remaining term of approximately 5.3 years) to large charterers such as BP Shipping Limited, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., Trafigura Beheer B.V., and subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. All our charters provide for the receipt of a fixed base rate for the life of the charter, and in the case of 10 of our 11 time charters, also provide for profit sharing arrangements in excess of the base rate.
 
Business Strategies
 
  
Our primary business objective is to increase quarterly distributions per unit over time. In order to achieve this objective we execute the following business strategies:
 
 
Maintain and grow our cash flows.  We believe that the medium to long-term, fixed-rate nature of our charters, our profit sharing arrangements, our contracted and potential acquisitions from Capital Maritime or third parties and our agreement with Capital Ship Management for the commercial and technical management of our vessels, which provides for a fixed management fee for an initial term of approximately five years from when we take delivery of each vessel and includes the expenses for its next scheduled special or intermediate survey, as applicable, and related drydocking will provide a stable and growing base of revenue and predictable expenses that will result in stable cash flows in the medium term.
 
 
Continue to grow our fleet.  We intend to continue to make strategic acquisitions and to take advantage of our unique relationship with Capital Maritime in a prudent manner that is accretive to our unitholders and to long-term distribution growth.  Since the Offering we have taken delivery of five newbuildings and have also acquired two additional vessels from Capital Maritime. We also expect to take delivery of one additional 12,000 dwt small tanker during the second quarter of 2008 and of two additional newbuildings in June and August of 2008. Furthermore, pursuant to our omnibus agreement with Capital Maritime, we have the opportunity to purchase six sister vessels currently owned or on order by Capital Maritime, but only in the event those vessels are fixed under medium to long-term charters. Capital Maritime also has a substantial newbuilding program in place and we will continue to evaluate opportunities to acquire both newbuildings and second-hand vessels, if and when they are chartered for more than two years, from Capital Maritime and from third parties as we seek to grow our fleet. We believe that our medium to long-term charters, strong relationships with reputable shipyards and financial flexibility will allow us to make additional accretive acquisitions based on our judgment and experience as to prevailing market conditions.
 
 
Capitalize on our relationship with Capital Maritime and expand our charters with recognized charterers.  We believe that we can leverage our relationship with Capital Maritime and its ability to meet the rigorous vetting processes of leading oil companies in order to attract new customers. We also plan to increase the number of vessels we charter to our existing charterers as well as enter into charter agreements with new customers in order to maintain a portfolio of charters that is diverse from a customer, geographic and maturity perspective. Following our Offering we have added Trafigura Beheer B.V. to our customer base, delivered the first of three vessels to Overseas Shipholding Group and chartered an additional vessel with BP Shipping Limited.
 
 
 
 
 
Maintain and build on our ability to meet rigorous industry and regulatory safety standards.  Capital Ship Management, an affiliate of our general partner that manages our vessels, has an excellent vessel safety record, is capable of fully complying with rigorous health, safety and environmental protection standards, and is committed to provide our customers with a high level of customer service and support. We believe that in order for us to be successful in growing our business in the future we will need to maintain our excellent vessel safety record and maintain and build on our high level of customer service and support.
 
Competitive Strengths
 
We believe that we are well-positioned to execute our business strategies and our future prospects for success are enhanced because of the following competitive strengths:
 
 
Stable and growing cash flows based on medium to long-term charters.  We believe that the medium to long-term, fixed-rate nature of our charters, our profit sharing arrangements and our fixed-rate management agreement provide a stable and growing base of revenue and predictable expenses that result in stable and growing cash flows. Our existing fleet has experienced significant growth since our Offering, almost doubling in terms of carrying capacity. In addition, we believe our intention to acquire the M/T Aristofanis in the second quarter of 2008, our commitment to purchase two additional vessels scheduled for delivery in 2008 and the potential opportunity to purchase up to an additional six sister vessels and up to 25 modern double-hull tankers of various sizes from Capital Maritime provides visible opportunity for future growth in our revenue, operating income and net income.
 
 
Strong relationship with Capital Maritime. We believe our relationship with Capital Maritime and its affiliates provides numerous benefits that are key to our long-term growth and success, including Capital Maritime’s reputation within the shipping industry and its network of strong relationships with many of the world’s leading oil companies, shipyards, commodity traders, and shipping companies. We also benefit from Capital Maritime’s expertise in technical fleet management and its ability to meet the rigorous vetting processes of some of the world’s most selective major international oil companies, including BP p.l.c., Royal Dutch Shell plc, StatoilHydro ASA, and most recently Chevron Corporation and ExxonMobil Corporation. We believe we are well-positioned not only to retain existing customers such as BP Shipping Limited, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., Trafigura Beheer B.V. and Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., but also to enter into agreements with other large charterers and oil companies.
 
 
Leading position in the product tanker market, with a modern, capable fleet, built to high specifications. Our fleet of 15 tankers includes the largest Ice Class 1A MR fleet in the world based on number of vessels and carrying capacity. The IMO II/III and Ice Class 1A classification notations of most of our vessels provide a high degree of flexibility as to what cargoes our charterers can choose to trade as they employ our fleet. We also believe that the range in size and geographic flexibility of our fleet are attractive to our charterers, allowing them to consider a variety of trade routes and cargoes. In addition, with an average age of approximately 2.5 years, our fleet is one of the youngest fleets of its size in the world.  Finally, we believe our vessels’ compliance with existing and expected regulatory standards, the high technical specifications of our vessels and our fleet’s flexibility to transport a wide variety of refined products and crude oil across a wide range of trade routes is attractive to our existing and potential charterers.
 
 
Financial strength and flexibility.  At the time of the Offering we entered into a non-amortizing revolving credit facility that provided us with the funds to purchase the vessels delivered to us to date, including the M/T Attikos, and we expect will provide us with the funds to pay a substantial portion of the purchase price for the remaining two newbuildings to be delivered in 2008. On March 19, 2008 we entered into a new 10-year revolving credit facility of up to $350.0 million, which is non-amortizing until March 2013, further enhancing our financial flexibility to realize new vessel acquisitions from Capital Maritime and third parties. We may use this facility to finance a portion of the acquisition price of certain identified vessels currently in Capital Maritime’s fleet which we may elect to acquire in the future and up to 50% of the purchase price of any potential future purchases of modern tanker vessels from Capital Maritime or any third parties. To date, we have used $46.0 million of this facility to fund part of the acquisition price of the M/T Amore Mio II from Capital Maritime and expect to use approximately $11.5 million in connection with the acquisition of the M/T Aristofanis in the second quarter of 2008.**
 
 

 
Our Customers
 
We provide marine transportation services under medium to long-term time charters or bareboat charters with counterparties that we believe are creditworthy. Currently, our customers are:
 
 
BP Shipping Limited, the shipping affiliate of BP p.l.c., one of the world’s largest producers of crude oil and natural gas. BP p.l.c. has exploration and production interests in 26 countries and as of December 31, 2006, BP p.l.c. had proved reserves of 17.7 billion barrels of oil and gas equivalent.
 
 
Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., the commodities division of Morgan Stanley, the international investment bank, is a leading commodities trading firm in the energy and metals markets, encompassing both physical and derivative capabilities.
 
 
Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., one of the largest independent shipping companies in the world operating crude and product tankers. As of December 31, 2007, Overseas Shipholding Group Inc.’s operating fleet consisted of 214 vessels, 44 of which were under construction, aggregating 14.8 million dwt.
 
 
Trafigura Beheer B.V., a large trader of crude oil and refined products based in The Netherlands and founded in 1993. Trafigura is the world’s largest independent oil trader with investments in industrial assets around the world of more than $600 million as of October 2007.
 
BP Shipping Limited and Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. accounted for 64% and 28% of our revenues, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2007 and 53% and 23% of the revenues, respectively, of our predecessor, for the year ended December 31, 2006. The loss of any significant customer or a substantial decline in the amount of services requested by a significant customer could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Our Fleet
 
At the time of the Offering on April 3, 2007, our fleet consisted of eight newly built, Ice Class 1A, IMO II/III double-hull, MR chemical/product tankers constructed by Hyundai MIPO Dockyard Co., Ltd. to high specifications.  We also agreed to purchase from Capital Maritime a further four Ice Class 1A IMO II/III sister vessels which were delivered in 2007 and three IMO II/III MR chemical/product tanker sister vessels constructed by STX Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. scheduled for delivery in 2008 at a fixed price. Sister vessels are vessels of similar specifications and size typically built at the same shipyard. All of the vessels are or were designed, constructed, inspected and tested in accordance with the rules and regulations of either Det Norske Veritas (DNV) or the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) and are under time or bareboat charters commencing at the time of their delivery. The three MR chemical/product tankers are chartered under bareboat charters to subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., which has an option  to purchase each vessel at the end of the eighth, ninth or tenth year of its charter.
 
Since the Offering, the size of our fleet has almost doubled in terms of carrying capacity. We have acquired the following vessels:
 
 
The four Ice Class 1A, IMO II/III, 47,000 dwt, MR chemical/product contracted newbuildings were delivered to us between May and September 2007 and delivered to Morgan Stanley Inc., their charterer. The charters for all four of these vessels are subject to profit sharing arrangements which allow each party to share additional revenues above the base rate on a 50/50 basis. Our current fleet of 12 newly built, Ice Class 1A MR vessels represents the largest such fleet in the world based on number of vessels and carrying capacity.  Ice Class 1A vessels may earn a premium during winter months as they are capable of navigating through many ice-covered routes inaccessible to standard product tankers.
 
 
The M/T Attikos, a 12,000 dwt, 2005 built, double-hull product tanker which is chartered to Trafigura Beheer B.V. under a charter with an earliest scheduled expiration date of September 2009, was our first non-contracted acquisition from Capital Maritime. The vessel was delivered to us in September 2007.
 
 
The M/T Alexandros II, a 51,258 dwt IMO II/III MR chemical/product tanker, the first of three such contracted newbuilding MR sister vessels, was delivered in January 2008 and delivered to subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., its charterer. The two sister vessels we have agreed to acquire from Capital Maritime are scheduled for delivery in June and August of 2008, respectively. All vessels are capable of transporting a range of refined oil products, chemicals (including ethanol and biodiesel feedstock), fuel oil and crude oil worldwide.
 
 
 
 
 
The M/T Amore Mio II, a 159,982 dwt, 2001 built, double-hull tanker, which is chartered to BP Shipping Limited under a charter with an earliest scheduled expiration date of January 2011, was acquired from Capital Maritime in March 2008. The charter is subject to a profit sharing arrangement which is calculated and settled monthly and which allows each party to share additional revenues above the base rate on a 50/50 basis.
 
In addition to the above vessels, we have entered into a letter of intent with Capital Maritime to acquire the M/T Aristofanis and intend to complete such acquisition during the second quarter of 2008. The M/T Aristofanis, a 12,000 dwt, 2005 built, double-hull product tanker, is chartered to Shell International Trading & Shipping Company Ltd. under a charter with an earliest scheduled expiration date of March 2010 and is a sister vessel to the M/T Attikos.
 
We expect that by the end of the third quarter of 2008 our fleet will consist of 18 double-hull tankers, including the M/T Aristofanis, with an average age of approximately 2.5 years.
 
Potential Additional Vessels from Capital Maritime
 
We intend to continue to make strategic acquisitions and to take advantage of our unique relationship with Capital Maritime in a prudent manner that is accretive to our unitholders and to long-term distribution growth. Pursuant to our omnibus agreement with Capital Maritime, Capital Maritime has granted us a right of first offer for any MR tankers in its fleet under charter for two or more years, giving us the opportunity to purchase up to an additional six vessels comprised of two 37,000 dwt Ice Class 1A MR chemical/product tanker sister vessels and four 51,000 dwt MR IMO II/III chemical/product tanker sister vessels in the future. Capital Maritime is, however, under no obligation to fix any of these six vessels under charters of two or more years.  All six vessels are currently under charter for less than two years or are yet to be chartered as they are under construction. Please read “Item 7B: Related Party Transactions” for a detailed description of our omnibus agreement with Capital Maritime.
 
In addition, Capital Maritime currently owns or has on order a total of 25 modern, double-hull product and crude oil tankers of different sizes which we may potentially acquire in the event those vessels were fixed under charters of two or more years.
 
The first table below provides summary information as of March 31, 2008 about the vessels in our fleet and the vessels we have contracted to acquire or may have the opportunity to acquire from Capital Maritime as well as their delivery date or expected delivery date to us and their employment. The table also includes the approximate expected termination date of the management agreement with Capital Ship Management with respect to each vessel. The second table provides information about the modern vessels in Capital Maritime’s fleet as of March 31, 2008 and the year they were built or expected delivery date to Capital Maritime. We may agree to purchase certain of these vessels from Capital Maritime in the future. Sister vessels are denoted by the same letter in the tables.
 
 
 
 

 
OUR FLEET
Vessel Name
Sister Vessels (1)
Year Built/ Delivery
Date
DWT
OPEX
(per
day)
Management
Agreement
Expiration
Duration/ Charter
Type (2)
Expiry of
Charter (3)
Daily Charter
Rate (Net) (4)
Profit Sharing
Charterer  
(5)
Description
                       
   
VESSELS CURRENTLY IN OUR FLEET
       
Initial Fleet – Delivered to Us At Time of the Offering (6)
               
                       
Atlantas
A
2006
36,760
$250
Jan-Apr 2011
8-year BC
Mar-2014
$15,000(7)
 
BP
Ice Class 1A IMO II/III Chemical/ Product
 
Aktoras
A
2006
36,759
$250
Apr-Jul 2011
8-year BC
Jun-2014
$15,000(7)
 
BP
Aiolos
A
2007
36,725
$250
 
8-year BC
Feb-2015
$15,000(7)
 
BP
Agisilaos
A
2006
36,760
$5,500
May-Aug 2011
2.5-year TC
Jan-2009
$17,500(7)
ü
BP
Arionas
A
2006
36,725
$5,500
Aug-Nov 2011
2.5-year TC
Apr-2009
$21,000(9)(8)
ü
BP
Axios
B
2007
47,872
$5,500
Dec-2011-Mar-2012
3-year TC
Jan-2010
$20,500(8)
ü
BP
Avax
B
2007
47,834
$5,500
Jun 2010
3-year TC
May-2010
$20,500
ü
BP
Assos
B
2006
47,872
$5,500
Feb-May 2011
3-year TC
Oct-2009
$20,000
ü
MS
Total DWT:
   
327,307
           
 
 
                       
Vessels Purchased from Capital Maritime since the Offering
           
                       
Atrotos (6)
B
May-2007
47,786
$5,500
Feb-May 2012
3-year TC
Apr-2010
$20,000
ü
MS
Ice Class 1A IMO II/III Chemical/ Product
Akeraios (6)
B
Jul-2007
47,781
$5,500
May-Aug 2012
3-year TC
Jun-2010
$20,000
ü
MS
Anemos I (6)
B
Sept-2007
47,782
$5,500
Jul-Oct 2012
3-year TC
Aug-2010
$20,000
ü
MS
Apostolos (6)
B
Sept-2007
47,782
$5,500
Jul-Oct 2012
3-year TC
Aug-2010
$20,000
ü
MS
Attikos (10)
C
 2005
12,000
$5,500
Sept-Nov 2012
26-28 mon. TC
Sept-2009
$13,503
 
Trafigura
Product
Alexandros II (11)(12)
 
D
Jan-2008
51,258
$250
 
Dec-2012-Mar 2013
10-year BC
Dec-2017
$13,000
 
OSG
IMO II/III Chem./Prod.
Amore Mio II (13)
E
2001
159,982
$8,500
Mar-Apr 2013
3-year TC
Jan-2011
$36,000
ü
BP
Crude Oil
Total DWT:
   
704,858
               
                       
   
VESSELS WE HAVE AGREED TO OR MAY PURCHASE FROM CAPITAL MARITIME
     
Additional Contracted Vessels (With Expected Delivery Date)
           
                       
Aristofanis (10)
C
2005
12,000
$5,500
 
2-year TC
Mar-2010
$12,952
 
Shell
Product
Aristotelis II (11)(12)
D
Jun-2008
51,000
$250
Mar-Jun 2013
10-year BC
May-2018
$13,000
 
OSG
IMO II/III Chem./Prod.
Aris II (11)(12)
D
Aug-2008
51,000
$250
May-Aug 2013
10-year BC
Jul-2018
$13,000
 
OSG
Total DWT:
   
114,000
       
 
     
 
 
 
 
 
Vessel Name
Sister Vessels (1)
Year Built/ Delivery
Date
DWT
OPEX
(per
day)
Management
Agreement
Expiration
Duration/ Charter
Type (2)
Expiry of
Charter (3)
Daily Charter
Rate (Net) (4)
Profit Sharing
Charterer  
(5)
Description
                       
May Purchase if Under Long-Term Charter (With Expected Delivery Date to Capital Maritime)
       
Aristidis (6)
A
Jan-2006
36,680
             
Ice Class 1A IMO II/III Chem./Prod.
Alkiviadis (6)
A
Mar-2006
36,721
             
Agamemnon II (11)
D
Oct-2008
51,000
             
IMO II/III Chemical/
Product
Ayrton III (11)
D
Jan-2009
51,000
             
Adonis II (11)
D
Jan-2009
51,000
             
Asterix II (11)
D
Mar-2009
51,000
             
Total DWT:
   
277,401
               
                       
                    ___________
 
(1)
Sister vessels, which are vessels of similar specifications and size typically built at the same shipyard, are denoted in the tables by the same letter.
(2)
TC: Time Charter, BC: Bareboat Charter.
(3)
Earliest possible redelivery date. With the exception of the charter for the M/T Attikos and the M/T Aristofanis, whose charters expire on the date of expiration, redelivery date is +/–30 days at the charterer’s option.
(4)
All rates quoted above are the net rates after we or our charterers have paid commissions on the base rate. The BP time and bareboat charters are subject to 1.25% commissions. The Trafigura time charter is subject to 2.5% commissions. The Shell time charter is subject to 2.25% commissions. We do not pay any commissions for the MS time charters.
(5)
BP: BP Shipping Limited. MS: Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., OSG: certain subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. Trafigura: Trafigura Beheer B.V.  Shell: Shell International Trading & Shipping Company Ltd.
(6)
These vessels were built by Hyundai MIPO Dockyard Co., Ltd., South Korea.
(7)
The last three years of the BC will be at a daily charter rate of $13,433 (net).
(8)
In addition to the commission on the gross charter rate, the ship broker is entitled to an additional 1.25% commission on the amount of profit share.
(9)
The last six months of the TC will be at a net daily charter rate of $19,000 plus a 50/50 profit sharing arrangement (from November 4, 2008 to April 4, 2009).
(10)
These vessels were built by Baima Shipyard, China. The M/T Attikos was acquired by us in September 2007. We intend to acquire the M/T Aristofanis by the end of the second quarter of 2008 in accordance with a letter of intent entered into with Capital Maritime in February 2008.
(11)
These vessels were built or are being built by STX Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., South Korea.
(12)
OSG has an option to purchase each of the three STX vessels delivered or to be delivered in 2008 at the end of the eighth, ninth or tenth year of the applicable charter, for $38.0 million, $35.5 million and $33.0 million, respectively, which option is exercisable six months before the date of completion of the eighth, ninth or tenth year of the charter. The expiration date above may therefore change depending on whether the charterer exercises its purchase option.
(13)
This vessel was built by Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd., South Korea and was acquired by us in March 2008.
 
 
 
 
 
CAPITAL MARITIME’S FLEET

Vessel Name
Sister Vessels (1)
Year
Built/Expected
Delivery Date
DWT
Description
Suezmaxes
       
Miltiadis M II (2)
-
2006
162,396
ICE Class 1A Product/Crude Oil
Alterego II (2)
E
2002
159,924
Crude Oil
Handy Tankers (3)
       
Achilleas II
F
Jun-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Athlos II
F
Jun-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Amor II
F
Jul-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Aktor II
F
Jul-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Aristos II
F
Aug-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Anaxagoras II
F
Aug-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Amadeus II
F
Sep-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Aiolos II
F
Sep-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Aktoras II
F
Oct-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Alkaios II
F
Oct-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Atlantas II
F
Nov-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Amfitrion II
F
Nov-2010
25,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Small Tankers – 14,000 dwt (4)
 
 
   
Amorito II
G
Sep-2008
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Allegro II
G
Nov-2008
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Archimidis II
G
Dec-2008
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Aias II
G
Apr-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Active II
G
Jun-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Amigo II
G
Jul-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Apollonas II
G
Aug-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Adamastos II
G
Sep-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Anikitos II
G
Dec-2009
14,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Small Tankers – 12,000 dwt (5)
 
 
 
 
Asopos
H
Aug-2008
12,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
Akadimos
H
Nov-2008
12,000
IMO II Chemical/Product
TOTAL DWT:
   
772,320
 
___________
(1)
Sister vessels, which are vessels of similar specifications and size typically built at the same shipyard, are denoted in the tables by the same letter.
(2)
These vessels were built by Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co., Ltd., South Korea.
(3)
These vessels are being built by Samho Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., South Korea.
(4)
These vessels are being built or were built by Baima Shipyard, China.
(5) 
These vessels are being built by Ziuziang Yinxing Shipyard Co. Ltd, China. 
 
 
 
 
 
Our Charters
 
All of our current vessels and the vessels we have contracted to purchase from Capital Maritime are or will be at the time of delivery under medium to long-term time charters or bareboat charters of more than two years. Under certain circumstances we may operate vessels in the spot market until the vessels have been fixed under appropriate medium to long-term charters.
 
Time Charters
 
A time charter is a contract for the use of a vessel for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate. Under a time charter, the vessel’s owner provides crewing and other services related to the vessel’s operation, the cost of which is included in the daily rate and the charterer is responsible for substantially all vessel voyage costs, except for commissions which are assumed by the owner. In the case of the vessels under time charter to Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., the charterer is also responsible for the payment of all commissions. The basic hire rate payable under the charters is a previously agreed daily rate, as specified in the charter, payable at the beginning of the month in U.S. Dollars. We currently have 11 vessels under time charter of which five are with Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., five with BP Shipping Limited and one with Trafigura Beheer B.V. Of our 11 time charters, 10 contain profit-sharing provisions that allow us to realize at a pre-determined percentage additional revenues when spot rates are higher than the base rates incorporated in our charters or, in some instances, through greater utilization of our vessels by our charterers.
 
Profit Sharing Arrangements
 
Morgan Stanley Profit Sharing. The profit sharing arrangements for our vessels time chartered with Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. are calculated on the basis of a weighted monthly average of three indices published daily by the Baltic Exchange based on specific routes and cargo sizes representative of the vessel’s trading. At the end of each month, the monthly average of each route is calculated and the Time Charter Equivalent (TCE) for a round voyage is estimated based upon the weighted average of the three routes, the speed and consumption of the vessel in question, bunker prices at agreed ports as published by Platts, port expenses adjusted twice a year and other parameters mutually agreed such as loading/discharging time, bad weather and commissions. If the weighted average hire rate is less than or equal to the basic hire rate, then we receive the basic hire rate only. If the weighted average hire exceeds the basic hire rate, then we receive the basic hire rate plus 50% of the excess. However, we also have the right to access the charterer’s annual results of operations for each vessel and if it is shown that the vessel has performed better than the estimated profit outlined above, then we may opt to use the charterer’s results of operations and are reimbursed the difference between profits received under the first option outlined above, and 50% of actual vessel profits above the basic hire rate. With the exception of the profit share arrangement for the M/T Assos, where 1.25% commission is deducted from the gross profit share amount, no commissions are payable on revenues derived from our profit shares. Annual results of operations from the charterer are to be presented by December 31 of each year for the period commencing December 1 of the previous year to November 30 of the year in question.
 
BP Profit Sharing. With the exception of the M/T Amore Mio II, our profit sharing arrangements for our vessels time chartered with BP Shipping Limited are based on the calculation of the TCE according to the “last to next” principle. Actual voyage revenues earned and received, actual expenses incurred and actual time taken to perform the voyage are used for the purpose of the calculation. The charterer is obliged to provide us with a copy of each fixture note and all reasonable documentation with respect to items of cost and earnings referring to each voyage within every calculation period, as well as with a statement listing actual voyage results for voyages completed and estimated results for any voyage not completed at the time of settlement. When actual revenue and/or expenses have not been settled, BP Shipping Limited’s estimates apply but remain subject to adjustment upon closing of actual accounts. If the average daily TCE is less than or equal to the basic gross hire rate, then we receive the basic net hire rate only. If the average daily TCE exceeds the basic gross hire rate, then we receive the basic net hire rate plus 50% of the excess over the gross hire rate. In addition to the 1.25% commission we pay on the gross charter rate for each vessel, the relevant ship broker is also entitled to an additional 1.25% commission on the amount of profit share received from the M/T Agisilaos, the M/T Arionas, the M/T Axios and the M/T Amore Mio II. In the case of the M/T Amore Mio II, the calculation of the profit share is based on the weighted monthly average of two indices published daily by the Baltic Exchange based on specific routes and cargo sizes representative of the vessel’s trading. The profit share with BP Shipping Limited is calculated and settled quarterly, except for the profit share for the M/T Amore Mio II, which is calculated and settled monthly.
 
TCE rate is a shipping industry performance measure used primarily to compare daily earnings generated by vessels on time charters with daily earnings generated by vessels on voyage charters, because charter hire rates for vessels on voyage charters are generally not expressed in per day amounts while charter hire rates for vessels on time charters generally are expressed in such amounts. TCE is expressed as per ship per day rate and is calculated as voyage and time charter revenues less voyage expenses during a period divided by the number of operating days during the period, which is consistent with industry standards.
 
 
 
 
Please read “—Our Fleet” above, including the chart and accompanying notes, for more information on our time charters, including expected expiration dates and daily charter rates.
 
Bareboat Charters
 
A bareboat charter is a contract pursuant to which the vessel owner provides the vessel to the customer for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate, and the customer provides for all of the vessel’s operating expenses including crewing, repairs, maintenance, insurance, stores, lube oils and communication expenses in addition to the voyage costs and generally assumes all risk of operation. The customer undertakes to maintain the vessel in a good state of repair and efficient operating condition and drydock the vessel during this period at its cost and as per the classification society requirements. The basic rate hire is payable to us monthly in advance in U.S. Dollars.
 
We currently have four vessels under bareboat charter, three with BP Shipping Limited and one with subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. The two vessels scheduled for delivery by the third quarter of 2008 have also been fixed under bareboat charters commencing at the time of delivery with subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. The charters entered into with subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. Our charters with respect to the M/T Alexandros II, Aristotelis II and Aris II include options for the charterer to purchase each vessel for $38.0 million, $35.5 million or $33.0 million at the end of the eighth, ninth or tenth year of the charter, respectively. In each case, the option to purchase the vessel must be exercised six months prior to the end of the charter year. Please read “—Our Fleet” above, including the chart and accompanying notes, for more information on our bareboat charters, including the expected expiration dates and daily charter rates.
 
Seasonality
 
Our vessels operate under medium to long-term charters and are not generally subject to the effect of seasonable variations in demand.
 
Management of Ship Operations, Administration and Safety
 
Capital Maritime provides, through its subsidiary Capital Ship Management, expertise in various functions critical to our operations. This affords a safe, efficient and cost-effective operation and, pursuant to a management agreement and an administrative services agreement we have entered into with Capital Ship Management, we have access to human resources, financial and other administrative services, including bookkeeping, audit and accounting services, administrative and clerical services, banking and financial services, client and investor relations and technical management services, including commercial management of the vessels, vessel maintenance and crewing (not required for vessels subject to bareboat charters), purchasing and insurance and shipyard supervision.
 
 Under our time charter arrangements, Capital Ship Management, our manager, is generally responsible for commercial, technical, health and safety and other management services related to the vessels’ operation, and the charterer is responsible for port expenses, canal dues and bunkers and, in the case of the Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. time charters, for commissions.  Pursuant to our management agreement, we pay a fixed daily fee of $5,500 per vessel for our time chartered vessels ($8,500 for the M/T Amore Mio II), for an initial term of approximately five years from when we take delivery of each vessel and covers vessel operating expenses, which include crewing, repairs and maintenance, insurance and the expenses of the next scheduled special or intermediate survey for each vessel, as applicable, and related drydocking. Please see the table in “—Our Fleet above for a list of the approximate expected termination dates of the management agreement with Capital Ship Management with respect to each vessel currently in our fleet. Capital Ship Management is directly responsible for providing all of these items and services. The sole expense we incur in connection with our vessels under bareboat charter is a daily fee of $250 per bareboat chartered vessel payable to Capital Ship Management, mainly to cover compliance costs. Capital Ship Management may provide these services to us directly or it may subcontract for certain of these services with other entities, including other Capital Maritime subsidiaries. Going forward, when we acquire new vessels or when the respective management agreements for our vessels expire, we will have to enter into new agreements which may provide for different fees or include different terms.  For more information on the management agreement and administrative services agreements we have with Capital Ship Management please read “Item 7B: Related Party Transactions—Management Agreement” and “—Administrative Services Agreement.”
 
Capital Ship Management operates under a safety and quality management system certified under the ISM Code and complies with the quality assurance standard ISO 9001, the environmental management standard ISO 14001 and the Occupational Health & Safety Management System (OHSAS) 18001 with Lloyds Register of Shipping. As a result, our vessels are operated in a manner intended to protect the safety and health of Capital Maritime’s employees, the general public and the environment. Capital Maritime’s technical management team actively manages the risks inherent in our business and is committed to eliminating incidents that threaten safety, such as groundings, fires, collisions and petroleum spills, as well as reducing emissions and waste generation.
 
 
 
 
Major Oil Company Vetting Process
 
Shipping in general, and crude oil, refined product and chemical tankers, in particular, have been, and will remain, heavily regulated. Many international and national rules, regulations and other requirements – whether imposed by the classification societies, international statutes (IMO, SOLAS (defined below), MARPOL, etc.), national and local administrations or industry – must be complied with in order to enable a shipping company to operate and a vessel to trade.
 
Traditionally there have been relatively few large players in the oil trading business and the industry is continuously consolidating. The so called “oil majors companies”, such as ExxonMobil Corporation, BP p.l.c., Royal Dutch Shell plc, Chevron Corporation, ConocoPhillips, StatoilHydro ASA and Total S.A., together with a few smaller companies, represent a significant percentage of the production, trading and, especially, shipping logistics (terminals) of crude and refined products world-wide. Concerns for the environment, health and safety have led the oil majors to develop and implement a strict due diligence process when selecting their commercial partners. This vetting process has evolved into a sophisticated and comprehensive risk assessment of both the vessel operator and the vessel.
 
While a plethora of parameters are considered and evaluated prior to a commercial decision, the oil majors, through their association, the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF), have developed and are implementing two basic tools: (i) a Ship Inspection Report Programme (SIRE) and (ii) the Tanker Management & Self Assessment (TMSA) Program. The former is a physical ship inspection based upon a thorough Vessel Inspection Questionnaire (VIQ), and performed by accredited OCIMF inspectors, resulting in a report being logged on SIRE, while the latter is a recent addition to the risk assessment tools used by the oil majors.
 
Based upon commercial needs, there are three levels of risk assessment used by the oil majors: (i) terminal use, which will clear a vessel to call at one of the oil major’s terminals; (ii) voyage charter, which will clear the vessel for a single voyage; and (iii) term charter, which will clear the vessel for use for an extended period of time. The depth, complexity and difficulty of each of these levels of assessment vary. While for the terminal use and voyage charter relationships a ship inspection and the operator’s TMSA will be sufficient for the assessment to be undertaken, a term charter relationship also requires a thorough office assessment. In addition to the commercial interest on the part of the oil major, an excellent safety and environmental protection record is necessary to ensure an office assessment is undertaken.
 
We believe Capital Maritime and Capital Ship Management are among a small number of ship management companies to have undergone and successfully completed audits by five major international oil companies in the last few years (i.e., BP p.l.c., Royal Dutch Shell plc, StatoilHydro ASA, Chevron Corporation and ExxonMobil Corporation).
 
Crewing and Staff
 
Capital Maritime recruits the senior officers and all other crew members for our vessels either directly through a subsidiary crewing office in Romania or through a crewing agent. Capital Maritime also maintains a presence in Russia and has entered into an agreement for the training of officers under ice conditions at a specialized training center in St. Petersburg. Capital Maritime’s vessels are currently manned primarily by Romanian, Russian and Filipino crew members. Having employed these crew configurations for a number of years, Capital Maritime has considerable experience in operating vessels in this configuration and has a pool of certified and experienced crew members.
 
 Classification, Inspection and Maintenance
 
Every oceangoing vessel must be “classed” and certified by a classification society. The classification society is responsible for verifying that the vessel has been built and maintained in accordance with the rules and regulations of the classification society and ship’s country of registry as well as the international conventions of which that country has accepted and signed. In addition, where surveys are required by international conventions and corresponding laws and ordinances of a flag state, the classification society will undertake them on application or by official order, acting on behalf of the authorities concerned. The classification society also undertakes on request other surveys and checks that are required by regulations and requirements of the flag state or port authority. These surveys are subject to agreements made in each individual case and/or to the regulations of the country concerned.
 
For maintaining the class status, regular and extraordinary surveys of hull and machinery, including the electrical plant, and any special equipment classed are required to be performed as follows:
 
Annual Surveys, which are conducted for the hull and the machinery at intervals of 12 months.
 
 
 
 
Intermediate Surveys, which are extended surveys and are conducted two and one-half years after commissioning and after each class renewal survey. In the case of newbuildings, the requirements of the intermediate survey can be met through an underwater inspection in lieu of drydocking the vessel.
 
Class Renewal Surveys (also known as special surveys) are carried out at the intervals indicated by the classification for the hull (usually at five year intervals). During the special survey, the vessel is thoroughly examined, including Non-Destructive Inspections (NDIs) to determine the thickness of the steel structures. Should the thickness be found to be less than class requirements, the classification society will order steel renewals. The classification society may grant a one-year grace period for completion of the special survey. Substantial amounts of funds may have to be spent for steel renewals to pass a special survey if the vessel experiences excessive wear and tear. In lieu of the special survey every five years, depending on whether a grace period is granted, a ship-owner has the option of arranging with the classification society for the vessel’s hull or machinery to be on a continuous survey cycle, in which every part of the vessel would be surveyed within a five-year cycle. At an owner’s application, the surveys required for class renewal may be split according to an agreed schedule to extend over the entire period of class. This process is referred to as ESP - Enhanced Survey Program and CSM - Continuous Machinery Survey.
 
All areas subject to survey, as defined by the classification society, are required to be surveyed at least once per class period, unless shorter intervals between surveys are prescribed elsewhere.
 
Most insurance underwriters make it a condition for insurance coverage that a vessel be certified as “in class” by a classification society which is a member of the International Association of Classification Societies. All of our vessels are certified as being “in class” by American Bureau of Shipping, Det Norske Veritas and, in the case of the M/T Attikos, China Classification Society.  All of the newbuildings we currently have on order and any other new and secondhand vessels that we purchase must be certified prior to their delivery. If any vessel we have contracted to purchase is not certified as “in class” on the date of closing, we have no obligation to take delivery of the vessel.
 
Risk Management and Insurance
 
The operation of any ocean-going vessel carries an inherent risk of catastrophic marine disasters, death or personal injury and property losses caused by adverse weather conditions, mechanical failures, human error, war, terrorism, piracy and other circumstances or events. The occurrence of any of these events may result in loss of revenues or increased costs or, in the case of marine disasters, catastrophic liabilities. Although we believe our current insurance program is comprehensive, we cannot insure against all risks, and we cannot be certain that all covered risks are adequately insured against or that we will be able to achieve or maintain similar levels of coverage throughout a vessel’s useful life. Furthermore, there can be no guarantee that any specific claim will be paid by the insurer or that it will always be possible to obtain insurance coverage at reasonable rates. More stringent environmental regulations at times in the past have resulted in increased costs for, and may result in the lack of availability of, insurance against the risks of environmental damage or pollution. Moreover, under the terms of our bareboat charters, the charterer provides for the insurance of the vessel, and as a result, these vessels may not be adequately insured and/or in some cases may be self-insured. Any uninsured or under-insured loss could harm our business and financial condition.
 
We currently carry “hull and machinery”, “increased value”, “protection and indemnity” and “war risk” insurance coverage for each of our vessels to protect against most of the accident-related risks involved in the conduct of our business:
 
 
Hull and machinery insurance covers loss of or damage to a vessel due to marine perils such as collisions, grounding and weather and the coverage is usually to an agreed “insured value” which, as a matter of policy, is never less than the particular vessel’s fair market value.
 
 
Increased value insurance augments hull and machinery insurance cover by providing a low-cost means of increasing the insured value of the vessels in the event of a total loss casualty.

 
Protection and indemnity insurance is the principal coverage for third party liabilities and indemnifies against other liabilities incurred while operating vessels, including injury to the crew, third parties, cargo or third party property loss for which the shipowner is responsible and pollution. The current available amount of our coverage for pollution is $1.0 billion per vessel per incident.

 
War Risks insurance covers such items as piracy and terrorism.
 
Not all risks are insured and not all risks are insurable. The principal insurable risks which nevertheless remain uninsured across the fleet are “loss of hire” and “strikes.” Capital Maritime does not insure these risks because the costs are regarded as disproportionate to the benefit.
 
 
 
 
The following table sets forth certain information regarding our insurance coverage as of December 31, 2007.

Type
 
Aggregate Sum Insured For All Vessels in our Existing Fleet
     
Hull and Machinery
 
$551.0 million (increased value insurance (including excess liabilities) provides additional coverage).
Increased Value (including Excess Liabilities)
 
Up to $268.0 million additional coverage in total.
Protection and Indemnity (P&I)
 
Pollution liability claims: limited to $1.0 billion per vessel per incident.
War Risk
 
$819.0 million.
 
The International Product Tanker Industry
 
The international seaborne transportation industry represents the most cost effective method of transporting large volumes of crude oil and refined petroleum products. The seaborne movement of refined petroleum products between regions addresses demand and supply imbalances for such products caused by the lack of resources or refining capacity in consuming countries. Global demand for the shipping of refined products and crude oil has grown historically at a faster rate than the demand for the refined products and the crude oil themselves.  The demand for product and crude oil tankers is cyclical and a function of several factors, including the general strength of the economy, location of oil production and the distance from refineries as well as refining and consumption and world oil demand and supply. Due to increasing environmental restrictions on the building of refineries in the countries that belong to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (the “OECD”), additional refineries are expected to continue to be built at locations far from such points of consumption, resulting in refined product tankers being required to travel longer distances on each voyage.
 
Competition
 
We operate in a highly fragmented, highly diversified global market with many charterers, owners and operators of vessels. Competition for charters can be intense and depends on price as well as on the location, size, age, condition and acceptability of the vessel and its operator to the charterer and is frequently tied to having an available vessel which has met the strict operational and financial standards established by oil majors to pre-qualify or vet tanker operators prior to entering into charters with them. Although we believe that at the present time no single company has a dominant position in the markets in which we compete, that could change and we may face substantial competition for medium to long-term charters from a number of experienced companies who may have greater resources or experience than we do when we try to recharter our vessels. However, we believe the young age of our fleet which is one of the youngest in the industry, the high specifications of our vessels, including the ability of most of our vessels to transport refined oil products and certain chemicals, and the fact that 11 of our 15 charter contracts will expire on or after January 2010 (the date at which all single-hull tankers are due to be phased out under IMO regulations) when the number of vessels available for rehire will have decreased, position us well to recharter our vessels. In addition, Capital Maritime is among a small number of ship management companies that has undergone and successfully completed audits by five major international oil companies in the last few years, including audits with BP p.l.c., Royal Dutch Shell plc, StatoilHydro ASA, Chevron Corporation and ExxonMobil Corporation. We believe our ability to comply with the rigorous and comprehensive standards of major oil companies relative to less qualified or experienced operators allows us to compete effectively for new charters.
 
Regulation
 
General
 
Our operations and our status as an operator and manager of ships are significantly regulated by international conventions, (i.e. SOLAS, MARPOL), Class requirements, U.S. federal, state and local and foreign health, safety and environmental protection laws and regulations, including OPA 90, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act ("CERCLA"), the U.S. Port and Tanker Safety Act, the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, regulations adopted by the IMO and the European Union, various volatile organic compound air emission requirements, IMO/U.S. Coast Guard pollution regulations and various Safety of Life at Sea ("SOLAS") amendments, as well as other regulations described below. In addition, various jurisdictions either have or are considering regulating the management of ballast water to prevent the introduction of non-indigenous species considered to be invasive. Compliance with these laws, regulations and other requirements could entail additional expense, including vessel modifications and implementation of certain operating procedures.
 
We are also required by various other governmental and quasi-governmental agencies to obtain permits, licenses and certificates for our vessels, depending upon such factors as the country of registry, the commodity transported, the waters in which the vessel operates, the nationality of the vessel’s crew, the age and size of the vessel and our status as owner or charterer. Failure to maintain necessary permits, licenses or certificates could require us to incur substantial costs or temporarily suspend operations of one or more of our vessels.
 
 
 
 
We believe that the heightened environmental and quality concerns of insurance underwriters, regulators and charterers will in the future impose greater inspection and safety requirements on all vessels in the shipping industry. In addition to inspections by us, our vessels are subject to both scheduled and unscheduled inspections by a variety of governmental and private entities, each of which may have unique requirements. These entities include the local port authorities (such as U.S. Coast Guard, harbor master or equivalent), classification societies, flag state administration P&I Clubs, charterers, and particularly terminal operators and major oil companies which conduct frequent vessel inspections.
 
Our vessels operate in full compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. However, because such laws and regulations frequently change and may impose increasingly strict requirements, we cannot predict the ultimate cost of complying with these and any future requirements or the impact of these and any future requirements on the resale value or useful lives of our vessels.
 
United States Requirements
 
The United States regulates the tanker industry with an extensive regulatory and liability regime for environmental protection and the cleanup of oil spills, primarily through OPA 90 and CERCLA.
 
OPA 90 affects all vessel owners and operators shipping oil or petroleum products to, from, or within U.S. waters. The law phases out the use of tankers having single-hulls and can effectively impose unlimited liability on vessel owners and operators in the event of an oil spill. Under OPA 90, vessel owners, operators and bareboat charterers are liable, without regard to fault, for all containment and clean-up costs and other damages, including natural resource damages and economic loss without physical damage to property, arising from oil spills and pollution from their vessels. OPA 90 had historically limited liability to the greater of $1,200 per gross ton or $10.0 million per tanker that is over 3,000 gross tons (subject to possible adjustment for inflation), unless the incident was caused by gross negligence, willful misconduct, or a violation of certain regulations, in which case liability was unlimited. Amendments to OPA 90 signed into law on July 11, 2006, however, increased these limits on the liability of responsible parties to the greater of $1,900 per gross ton or $16.0 million per tanker that is double-hulled and over 3,000 gross tons. In addition, OPA 90 does not preempt state law and permits individual states to impose their own liability regimes with regard to oil pollution incidents occurring within their boundaries. Coastal states have enacted pollution prevention, liability and response laws, many providing for unlimited liability. CERCLA, which applies to the discharge of hazardous substances (other than oil) whether on land or at sea, contains a similar liability regime and provides for cleanup, removal and natural resource damages. Liability under CERCLA is limited to the greater of $300 per gross ton or $0.5 million, unless the incident is caused by gross negligence, willful misconduct, or a violation of certain regulations, in which case liability is unlimited.
 
The financial responsibility regulations for tankers issued under OPA 90 also require owners and operators of vessels entering U.S. waters to obtain, and maintain with the U.S. Coast Guard, Certificates of Financial Responsibility, or COFRs, in the amount of $1,500 per gross ton for tankers, combining the previous OPA 90 limitation of liability of $1,200 per gross ton with the CERCLA liability of $300 per gross ton. The U.S. Coast Guard has indicated that it intends to propose a rule that will increase the required amount of such COFRs to $2,200 per gross ton to reflect the higher limits on liability imposed by the July 2006 amendments to OPA 90, as described above. Under the regulations, owners or operators of fleets of vessels are required to demonstrate evidence of financial responsibility for each covered tanker up to the maximum aggregate liability under OPA 90 and CERCLA. All of our vessels that need COFRs have them.
 
We insure each of our tankers with pollution liability insurance in the maximum commercially available amount of $1.0 billion per incident. A catastrophic spill could exceed the insurance coverage available, in which event there could be a material adverse effect on our business. OPA 90 requires that tankers over 5,000 gross ton calling at U.S. ports have double hulls if contracted after June 30, 1990 or delivered after January 1, 1994. Furthermore, OPA 90 calls for the phase-out of all single hull tankers by the year 2015 according to a schedule that is based on the size and age of the vessel, unless the tankers are retrofitted with double-hulls. All of our current vessels as well as the vessels that we have agreed to purchase have double hulls.
 
OPA 90 also amended the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (the "Clean Water Act") to require owners and operators of vessels to adopt contingency plans for reporting and responding to oil spill scenarios up to a “worst case” scenario and to identify and ensure, through contracts or other approved means, the availability of necessary private response resources to respond to a “worst case discharge.” In addition, periodic training programs and drills for shore and response personnel and for vessels and their crews are required. Our vessel response plans have been approved by the U.S. Coast Guard.
 
The Clean Water Act prohibits the discharge of oil or hazardous substances in U.S. navigable waters and imposes strict liability in the form of penalties for unauthorized discharges. The Clean Water Act also imposes substantial liability for the costs of removal, remediation and damages and complements the remedies available under the more recent OPA 90 and CERCLA, discussed above. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the "EPA") had exempted the discharge of ballast water and other substances incidental to the normal operation of vessels in U.S. ports from Clean Water Act permitting requirements. However, on March 30, 2005, a U.S. District Court ruled that the EPA exceeded its authority in creating an exemption for ballast water. On September 18, 2006, the court issued an order invalidating the exemption in the EPA’s regulations for all discharges incidental to the normal operation of a vessel as of September 30, 2008, and directing the EPA to develop a system for regulating all discharges from vessels by that date. The EPA has appealed this decision. However, if the exemption is ultimately repealed, we would be subject to Clean Water Act permit requirements that could include ballast water treatment obligations that could increase the cost of operating in the United States. For example, this could require the installation of equipment on our vessels to treat ballast water before it is discharged or the implementation of other port facility disposal arrangements or procedures at potentially substantial cost and/or otherwise restrict our vessels from entering U.S. waters.
 
 
 
 
We believe that we are in compliance with OPA 90, CERCLA and all applicable state regulations in U.S. ports where our vessels call.
 
International Requirements
 
The IMO has also negotiated international conventions that impose liability for oil pollution in international waters and a signatory’s territorial waters. In September 1997, the IMO adopted Annex VI to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships to address air pollution from ships. Annex VI, which became effective in May 2005, sets limits on sulphur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from ship exhausts and prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. Annex VI also includes a global cap on the sulphur content of fuel oil and allows for special areas to be established with more stringent controls on sulphur emissions. A failure to comply with Annex VI requirements could result in a vessel not being able to operate.
 
All of our vessels are subject to Annex VI regulations. We believe that our existing vessels meet relevant Annex VI requirements and that our undelivered product tankers will be fitted with these emission control systems prior to their delivery.
 
The ISM Code, promulgated by the IMO, also requires the party with operational control of a vessel to develop an extensive safety management system that includes, among other things, the adoption of a safety and environmental protection policy setting forth instructions and procedures for operating its vessels safely and describing procedures for responding to emergencies. The ISM Code requires that vessel operators obtain a safety management certificate for each vessel they operate. No vessel can obtain a certificate unless its manager has been awarded a document of compliance, issued by each flag state, under the ISM Code. All of our ocean going vessels are ISM certified.
 
Noncompliance with the ISM Code and other IMO regulations may subject the shipowner or bareboat charterer to increased liability, may lead to decreases in available insurance coverage for affected vessels and may result in the denial of access to, or detention in, some ports. For example, the U.S. Coast Guard and EU authorities have indicated that vessels not in compliance with the ISM Code will be prohibited from trading in U.S. and EU ports.
 
Many countries have ratified and follow the liability plan adopted by the IMO and set out in the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage of 1969 (the "CLC") (the United States, with its separate OPA 90 regime, is not a party to the CLC). Under this convention and depending on whether the country in which the damage results is a party to the 1992 Protocol to the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, a vessel’s registered owner is strictly liable for pollution damage caused in the territorial waters of a contracting state by discharge of persistent oil, subject to certain defenses. Under an amendment to the Protocol that became effective on November 1, 2003, for vessels of 5,000 to 140,000 gross tons, liability will be limited to approximately $6.6 million plus $926 for each additional gross ton over 5,000. For vessels of over 140,000 gross tons, liability will be limited to approximately $131.0 million. As the convention calculates liability in terms of a basket of currencies, these figures are based on currency exchange rates on December 31, 2006. The right to limit liability is forfeited under the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage where the spill is caused by the owner’s actual fault and under the 1992 Protocol where the spill is caused by the owner’s intentional or reckless conduct. Vessels trading to states that are parties to these conventions must provide evidence of insurance covering the liability of the owner. In jurisdictions where the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage has not been adopted, various legislative schemes or common law regimes govern, and liability is imposed either on the basis of fault or in a manner similar to that convention. We believe that our P&I insurance will cover the liability under the plan adopted by the IMO.
 
IMO regulations also require owners and operators of vessels to adopt Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plans ("SMPEPs"). Periodic training and drills for response personnel and for vessels and their crews are required. The SMPEPs required for our vessels are in place.
 
 
 
 
In addition, our operations are subject to compliance with the International Bulk Chemical ("IBC") Code, as required by MARPOL and SOLAS for chemical tankers built after July 1, 1986, which provides ship design, construction and equipment requirements and other standards for the bulk transport of certain liquid chemicals. Under October 2004 amendments to the IBC Code (implemented to meet recent revisions to SOLAS and Annex II to MARPOL), some previously unrestricted vegetable oils, including animal fats and marine oils, must be transported in chemical tankers meeting certain double-hull construction requirements. Our vessels may transport such cargoes but are restricted as to the volume they are able to transport per cargo tank. This restriction does not apply to edible oils. In addition, those amendments require re-evaluation of the categorization of certain products with respect to their properties as marine pollutants, as well as related ship type and carriage requirements. Where necessary pollution data is not supplied for those products missing such data, it is possible that the bulk carriage of such products will be prohibited.
 
Vessel Security Regulations
 
Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there have been a variety of initiatives intended to enhance vessel security. On November 25, 2002, the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 ("MTSA") came into effect. To implement certain portions of the MTSA, in July 2003, the U.S. Coast Guard issued regulations requiring the implementation of certain security requirements aboard vessels operating in waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.
 
Similarly, in December 2002, amendments to SOLAS created a new chapter of the convention dealing specifically with maritime security. The new chapter went into effect in July 2004, and imposes various detailed security obligations on vessels and port authorities, most of which are contained in the newly created International Ship and Port Facilities Security ("ISPS") Code. Among the various requirements are:
 
 
on-board installation of automatic identification systems to enhance vessel-to-vessel and vessel-to-shore communications;
 
on-board installation of ship security alert systems;
 
the development of vessel security plans; and
 
compliance with flag state security certification requirements.
 
The U.S. Coast Guard regulations, intended to align with international maritime security standards, exempted non-U.S. vessels from MTSA vessel security measures provided such vessels had on board, by July 1, 2004, a valid International Ship Security Certificate that attests to the vessel’s compliance with SOLAS security requirements and the ISPS Code. We have implemented the various security measures addressed by the MTSA, SOLAS and the ISPS Code and have ensured that our vessels are compliant with all applicable security requirements.
 
 
 
 
C. Organizational Structure
 
 
Please also see Exhibit 8.1 to this Annual Report for a list of our significant subsidiaries as of December 31, 2007.

 
D. Property, Plants and Equipment
 
Other than our vessels, we do not have any material property.

 
Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments.
 
Not Applicable.
 
 
 
 
Item 5.     Operating and Financial Review and Prospects.
 
You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with the audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements and related notes of Capital Product Partners L.P. included elsewhere in this Annual Report. Among other things, those financial statements include more detailed information regarding the basis of presentation for the following information. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and are presented in U.S. Dollars.
 
A. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Overview
 
We are an international owner of product tankers formed in January 2007 by Capital Maritime, an international shipping company with a long history of operating and investing in the shipping market.  As of December 31, 2007, our fleet consisted of 13 double-hull, high specification tankers, eight of which were transferred to us by Capital Maritime at the time of our Offering. Concurrently with the Offering, we also agreed to purchase an additional seven newbuildings from Capital Maritime delivered or scheduled for delivery during 2007 and 2008 at a fixed price, four of which had been delivered as of December 31, 2007. These four Ice Class 1A IMO II/III newbuilding sister vessels were delivered between May and September 2007. In September 2007 we also acquired the M/T Attikos, a 12,000 dwt, 2005 built product tanker from Capital Maritime which we had not previously agreed to purchase. In January 2008 we took delivery of the M/T Alexandros II, a 51,258 dwt MR IMO II/III chemical/product tanker, the first of three such newbuilding sister vessels which we contracted to acquire from Capital Maritime at the time of our Offering. The remaining two vessels are scheduled for delivery in June and August 2008 respectively. In addition, in the first quarter of 2008 we acquired the M/T Amore Mio II, a 159,982 dwt, 2001 built tanker from Capital Maritime. We also intend to acquire the M/T Aristofanis, a 12,000 dwt, 2005 built product tanker, from Capital Maritime during the second quarter of 2008. We expect that by the end of the third quarter of 2008 our fleet will consist of 18 double-hull tankers, including the M/T Aristofanis, with an average age of approximately 2.5 years.

Our primary business objective is to provide our unitholders with steadily rising distributions per unit over the long-term. Our growth strategy focuses on maintaining and growing our cash flows, continuing to grow our product tanker fleet and maintaining and building on our ability to meet rigorous industry and regulatory safety standards. We believe that the combination of the medium to long-term nature of our charters and our agreement with Capital Ship Management for the commercial and technical management of our vessels, which provides for a fixed management fee for an initial term of approximately five years from when we take delivery of each vessel, will provide us with a strong base of stable cash flows in the medium term. We intend to continue to make strategic acquisitions and leverage the expertise and reputation of Capital Maritime in a prudent manner that is accretive to our unitholders and to long-term distribution growth.

Our Initial Public Offering
 
On April 3, 2007, we completed our Offering on the Nasdaq Global Market of 13,512,500 common units at a price of $21.50 per unit which included 1,762,500 common units issued to the underwriters in connection with the exercise of their over-allotment option. The Offering also included 8,805,522 subordinated units issued to Capital Maritime and 455,470 general partner units issued to Capital GP L.L.C., our general partner, a wholly owned subsidiary of Capital Maritime. The net proceeds from the Offering were $270,472,956.0, including the proceeds from the exercise of the over-allotment option by the underwriters. We did not receive any proceeds from the sale of our common units. Capital Maritime used part of the proceeds from our Offering to repay the debt on the eight vessels that made up our fleet at the time of the Offering. Capital Maritime transferred its interest in the vessel-owning companies of these eight vessels to us at the time of the Offering. Capital Maritime also paid the offering expenses, underwriting discounts, selling commissions and brokerage fees incurred in connection with the Offering. As of December 31, 2007, Capital Maritime owned a 40.7% interest in us, including a 2% interest through its ownership of our general partner.
 
Potential Additional Vessels
 
Pursuant to our omnibus agreement with Capital Maritime, we have been granted a right of first offer to purchase an additional six vessels from Capital Maritime if they are fixed under charters of two or more years. Capital Maritime also owns or has on order a total of 25 modern, double-hull, modern tankers of different sizes which we may potentially acquire in the event those vessels were fixed under charters of two or more years. Furthermore, we will continue to evaluate opportunities to acquire both newbuildings and second-hand vessels from Capital Maritime and from third parties as we seek to grow our fleet.
 
Historical Results of Operations
 
We commenced operations as an independent entity on April 4, 2007, at which time Capital Maritime transferred its interest in eight vessel-owning companies to us. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future. Specifically, our audited consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements are not comparable, as our Offering and certain other transactions that occurred during 2007, including the delivery of four newbuildings, the acquisition of the M/T Attikos, the agreement we entered into with Capital Ship Management for the provision of management and administrative services to our fleet for a fixed fee and the new financing arrangements we entered into, have affected our results of operations. Furthermore, for the year ended December 31, 2006, only six of the vessels in our current fleet had been delivered to Capital Maritime. Five of these vessels were delivered between April and November 2006 and were in operation for only a portion of the year.
 
 
 
 
For more detail on the differences between our historical results and expected future results, please read “—Factors to Consider when Evaluating our Results” and “—Results of Operations” below.
 
Accounting for Deliveries of Vessels
 
All vessels we acquire or have acquired from Capital Maritime are or were transferred to us at historical cost and accounted for as a combination of entities under common control or a transfer of assets between entities under common control. All assets, liabilities and equity, other than the relevant vessel, related charter agreement and related permits, of these vessels’ ship-owning companies were retained by Capital Maritime.
 
At the time of our Offering, Capital Maritime contributed eight vessels to our fleet. Between May and September 2007 we acquired an additional five vessels from Capital Maritime for a total purchase price of $247.0 million. These five vessels have been recorded in our financial statements at the amount of $166.1 million, which represents the net book value of the vessels as reflected in Capital Maritime’s consolidated financial statements at the time of transfer. We recognize transfers of assets between entities under common control at Capital Maritime’s basis in the assets contributed. The amount of the purchase price in excess of Capital Maritime’s basis in the assets, $80.9 million, was recognized as a reduction to partners’ equity and presented as a financing activity in the statement of cash flows. For additional information on how we have accounted for specific transfers of vessels please see Note 1 (Basis of Presentation and General Information) to our consolidated and predecessor combined financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.
 
Our Charters
 
We generate revenues by charging our customers for the use of our vessels to transport their products. Historically, we have provided services to our customers under the following two types of contractual relationships:
 
 
Time charters, which are contracts for the use of a vessel for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate. With the exception of our time charters with Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. where we receive net daily rates, we are responsible for the payment of all commissions under our time charters. All other expenses related to time charter voyages are assumed by the charterers. Capital Ship Management, our manager, is generally responsible for commercial, technical, health and safety and other management services related to the vessels’ operation. With the exception of the time charter for the M/T Attikos, as of December 31, 2007 all of our time charter agreements contained profit sharing arrangements. Profit sharing refers to an arrangement between owners and charterers to share, at a pre-determined percentage, voyage profit in excess of the basic hire rate.
 
 
Bareboat charters, which are contracts pursuant to which the vessel owner provides the vessel to the charterer for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate, and the customer provides for all of the vessel’s operating expenses including crewing, repairs, maintenance, insurance, stores, lube oils and communication expenses in addition to the voyage costs (with the exception of commissions) and generally assumes all risk of operation.
 
As of December 31, 2007, all of the vessels in our fleet as well as the two vessels expected to be delivered in 2008 were under medium- to long-term time or bareboat charters of between two to 10 years, with an average remaining term of approximately 5.3 years commencing at the time of their delivery. In addition, of our 13 charter contracts as of December 31, 2007, nine were scheduled to expire on or after January 2010 and of our 10 time charters, nine contained profit-sharing arrangements. The three-year time charter of the M/T Amore Mio II, purchased in March 2008 from Capital Maritime, also contains a profit-sharing arrangement.
 
All of our vessels are under charter contracts with BP Shipping Limited, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., Trafigura Beheer B.V., and subsidiaries of Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. For the year ended December 31 2007, BP Shipping Limited and Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. accounted for 64% and 28% of our revenues, respectively, and 53% and 23% of our revenues for the year ended December 31, 2006, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2006, Canterbury Tankers Inc., the charterer for the M/T Attikos, represented 24% of the revenues of our predecessor. During 2008, we expect to derive the majority of our revenues from BP Shipping Limited, Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc., and Overseas Shipholding Group Inc. In the future, as our fleet expands, we also expect to enter into charters with new charterers in order to maintain a portfolio that is diverse from a customer, geographic and maturity perspective. The vessel purchased in March 2008 from Capital Maritime is also under time charter with BP Shipping Limited. We may in the future operate vessels in the spot market until the vessels have been chartered under appropriate medium to long-term charters.
 
 
 
 
Please read “Item 4: Business—Our Fleet”, “Item 4: Business—Our Charters” and “Item 4: Business—Profit Sh